Currently, Chlamydia trachomatis still possesses a significant impact on public health, with more than 130 million new cases each year, alongside a high prevalence of asymptomatic infections (approximately 80% in women and 50% in men). C. trachomatis infection involves a wide range of different cell types, from cervical epithelial cells, testicular Sertoli cells to Synovial cells, leading to a broad spectrum of pathologies of varying severity both in women and in men. Several two-dimensional in vitro cellular models have been employed for investigating C. trachomatis host–cell interaction, although they present several limitations, such as the inability to mimic the complex and dynamically changing structure of in vivo human host-tissues. Here, we present a brief overview of the most cutting-edge three-dimensional cell-culture models that mimic the pathophysiology of in vivo human tissues and organs for better translating experimental findings into a clinical setting. Future perspectives in the field of C. trachomatis research are also provided.

Better in vitro tools for exploring Chlamydia trachomatis pathogenesis

Filardo S.;Di Pietro M.;Sessa R.
2022

Abstract

Currently, Chlamydia trachomatis still possesses a significant impact on public health, with more than 130 million new cases each year, alongside a high prevalence of asymptomatic infections (approximately 80% in women and 50% in men). C. trachomatis infection involves a wide range of different cell types, from cervical epithelial cells, testicular Sertoli cells to Synovial cells, leading to a broad spectrum of pathologies of varying severity both in women and in men. Several two-dimensional in vitro cellular models have been employed for investigating C. trachomatis host–cell interaction, although they present several limitations, such as the inability to mimic the complex and dynamically changing structure of in vivo human host-tissues. Here, we present a brief overview of the most cutting-edge three-dimensional cell-culture models that mimic the pathophysiology of in vivo human tissues and organs for better translating experimental findings into a clinical setting. Future perspectives in the field of C. trachomatis research are also provided.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11573/1654161
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