The COVID-19 pandemic has had a deep impact on university education, necessitating an abrupt shift from face-to-face learning to distance learning (DL). This has created new challenges, especially for those courses in which practical activities and internships are integral parts of the education program. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of DL on the study progress of a population of pregraduate students of medicine, dentistry, and healthcare professions. The survey was administered through an anonymous questionnaire by sharing a Google Forms link. Demographic data and educational background information were collected to obtain a profile of the participants. Different aspects of DL were investigated, including availability of digital devices, quality of connection, and environmental conditions; other questions focused on the effects of DL on students' progress and professional maturation. Measures of association were also calculated using the chi-squared test, Cramer V, and Somers D. Among the 372 who participated, the results showed that students had a positive attitude toward online classroom and that DL did not substantially affect their progress. Most of the associations were statistically significant, also highlighting the effect of the degree course on the responses. Some critical issues clearly emerged, however, including the lack of adequate devices and environmental conditions due to economic disparity, poor relationships, suspension of internship programs, and clinical training. The results suggest that DL cannot be considered as a substitute for classroom-based medical education outside an emergency context.

Student evaluation of distance learning during the COVID-19 pandemic: a cross-sectional survey on medical, dental, and healthcare students at Sapienza University of Rome

Lollobrigida, Marco
Primo
;
Ottolenghi, Livia
Secondo
;
Corridore, Denise
;
Serafini, Giorgio
Penultimo
;
De Biase, Alberto
Ultimo
2022

Abstract

The COVID-19 pandemic has had a deep impact on university education, necessitating an abrupt shift from face-to-face learning to distance learning (DL). This has created new challenges, especially for those courses in which practical activities and internships are integral parts of the education program. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of DL on the study progress of a population of pregraduate students of medicine, dentistry, and healthcare professions. The survey was administered through an anonymous questionnaire by sharing a Google Forms link. Demographic data and educational background information were collected to obtain a profile of the participants. Different aspects of DL were investigated, including availability of digital devices, quality of connection, and environmental conditions; other questions focused on the effects of DL on students' progress and professional maturation. Measures of association were also calculated using the chi-squared test, Cramer V, and Somers D. Among the 372 who participated, the results showed that students had a positive attitude toward online classroom and that DL did not substantially affect their progress. Most of the associations were statistically significant, also highlighting the effect of the degree course on the responses. Some critical issues clearly emerged, however, including the lack of adequate devices and environmental conditions due to economic disparity, poor relationships, suspension of internship programs, and clinical training. The results suggest that DL cannot be considered as a substitute for classroom-based medical education outside an emergency context.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11573/1654077
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