Late neurocognitive sequelae are common among long-term brain tumour survivors, resulting in significantly worse quality of life. Cognitive rehabilitation through specific APP/software for PC/tablets represents an innovative intervention spreading in recent years. In this study, we aim to review the current evidence and trends regarding these innovative approaches. Methods: A systematic literature review was performed. Inclusion criteria were: (i) Studies recruiting patients diagnosed with any brain tumour before 21 years of age; (ii) studies assessing the role of digital interventions on cognitive outcomes. Case reports, case series, reviews, letters, conference proceedings, abstracts, and editorials were excluded. Results: Overall, nine studies were included; 152 patients (67.8% males) with brain tumours underwent a digital intervention. The mean age at diagnosis and the intervention enrolment ranged from 4.9 to 9.4 years and 11.1 to 13.3 years, respectively. The computer-based software interventions employed were: Cogmed, Captain’s Log, Fast ForWord, and Nintendo Wii. Most of these studies assessed the effects of cognitive training on working memory, attention, and performance in daily living activities. Conclusions: The studies suggest that this type of intervention improves cognitive functions, such as working memory, attention, and processing speed. However, some studies revealed only transient positive effects with a significant number of dropouts during follow-up. Trials with greater sample sizes are warranted. Motivating families and children to complete cognitive interventions could significantly improve cognitive outcomes and quality of life

Computer-based cognitive training in children with primary brain tumours: a systematic review

Leonardo Tariciotti
Secondo
;
Giulia Remoli;Danilo Menegatti;Francesco Delli Priscoli;Alessandro Giuseppi;angela mastronuzzi;Nicola Vanacore;
2022

Abstract

Late neurocognitive sequelae are common among long-term brain tumour survivors, resulting in significantly worse quality of life. Cognitive rehabilitation through specific APP/software for PC/tablets represents an innovative intervention spreading in recent years. In this study, we aim to review the current evidence and trends regarding these innovative approaches. Methods: A systematic literature review was performed. Inclusion criteria were: (i) Studies recruiting patients diagnosed with any brain tumour before 21 years of age; (ii) studies assessing the role of digital interventions on cognitive outcomes. Case reports, case series, reviews, letters, conference proceedings, abstracts, and editorials were excluded. Results: Overall, nine studies were included; 152 patients (67.8% males) with brain tumours underwent a digital intervention. The mean age at diagnosis and the intervention enrolment ranged from 4.9 to 9.4 years and 11.1 to 13.3 years, respectively. The computer-based software interventions employed were: Cogmed, Captain’s Log, Fast ForWord, and Nintendo Wii. Most of these studies assessed the effects of cognitive training on working memory, attention, and performance in daily living activities. Conclusions: The studies suggest that this type of intervention improves cognitive functions, such as working memory, attention, and processing speed. However, some studies revealed only transient positive effects with a significant number of dropouts during follow-up. Trials with greater sample sizes are warranted. Motivating families and children to complete cognitive interventions could significantly improve cognitive outcomes and quality of life
File allegati a questo prodotto
File Dimensione Formato  
Sciancalepore_Computer-Based Cognitive_2022.pdf

accesso aperto

Tipologia: Versione editoriale (versione pubblicata con il layout dell'editore)
Licenza: Creative commons
Dimensione 1.31 MB
Formato Adobe PDF
1.31 MB Adobe PDF Visualizza/Apri PDF

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11573/1652124
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? 0
  • Scopus ND
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 0
social impact