ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling complexes are multi-protein machines highly conserved across eukaryotic genomes. They control sliding and displacing of the nucleosomes, modulating histone-DNA interactions and making nucleosomal DNA more accessible to specific binding proteins during replication, transcription, and DNA repair, which are processes involved in cell division. The SRCAP and p400/Tip60 chromatin remodeling complexes in humans and the related Drosophila Tip60 complex belong to the evolutionary conserved INO80 family, whose main function is promoting the exchange of canonical histone H2A with the histone variant H2A in different eukaryotic species. Some subunits of these complexes were additionally shown to relocate to the mitotic apparatus and proposed to play direct roles in cell division in human cells. However, whether this phenomenon reflects a more general function of remodeling complex components and its evolutionary conservation remains unexplored. We have combined cell biology, reverse genetics, and biochemical approaches to study the subcellular distribution of a number of subunits belonging to the SRCAP and p400/Tip60 complexes and assess their involvement during cell division progression in HeLa cells. Interestingly, beyond their canonical chromatin localization, the subunits under investigation accumulate at different sites of the mitotic apparatus (centrosomes, spindle, and midbody), with their depletion yielding an array of aberrant outcomes of mitosis and cytokinesis, thus causing genomic instability. Importantly, this behavior was conserved by the Drosophila melanogaster orthologs tested, despite the evolutionary divergence between fly and humans has been estimated at approximately 780 million years ago. Overall, our results support the existence of evolutionarily conserved diverse roles of chromatin remodeling complexes, whereby subunits of the SRCAP and p400/Tip60 complexes relocate from the interphase chromatin to the mitotic apparatus, playing moonlighting functions required for proper execution of cell division.

Evolutionary conserved relocation of chromatin remodeling complexes to the mitotic apparatus / Messina, Giovanni; Prozzillo, Yuri; DELLE MONACHE, Francesca; Santopietro, MARIA VIRGINIA; Dimitri, Patrizio. - In: BMC BIOLOGY. - ISSN 1741-7007. - 20:(2022), pp. 1-21. [10.1186/s12915-022-01365-5]

Evolutionary conserved relocation of chromatin remodeling complexes to the mitotic apparatus

Giovanni Messina
Co-primo
;
Yuri Prozzillo
Co-primo
;
Francesca Delle Monache;Maria Virginia Santopietro
Penultimo
;
Patrizio Dimitri
Ultimo
2022

Abstract

ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling complexes are multi-protein machines highly conserved across eukaryotic genomes. They control sliding and displacing of the nucleosomes, modulating histone-DNA interactions and making nucleosomal DNA more accessible to specific binding proteins during replication, transcription, and DNA repair, which are processes involved in cell division. The SRCAP and p400/Tip60 chromatin remodeling complexes in humans and the related Drosophila Tip60 complex belong to the evolutionary conserved INO80 family, whose main function is promoting the exchange of canonical histone H2A with the histone variant H2A in different eukaryotic species. Some subunits of these complexes were additionally shown to relocate to the mitotic apparatus and proposed to play direct roles in cell division in human cells. However, whether this phenomenon reflects a more general function of remodeling complex components and its evolutionary conservation remains unexplored. We have combined cell biology, reverse genetics, and biochemical approaches to study the subcellular distribution of a number of subunits belonging to the SRCAP and p400/Tip60 complexes and assess their involvement during cell division progression in HeLa cells. Interestingly, beyond their canonical chromatin localization, the subunits under investigation accumulate at different sites of the mitotic apparatus (centrosomes, spindle, and midbody), with their depletion yielding an array of aberrant outcomes of mitosis and cytokinesis, thus causing genomic instability. Importantly, this behavior was conserved by the Drosophila melanogaster orthologs tested, despite the evolutionary divergence between fly and humans has been estimated at approximately 780 million years ago. Overall, our results support the existence of evolutionarily conserved diverse roles of chromatin remodeling complexes, whereby subunits of the SRCAP and p400/Tip60 complexes relocate from the interphase chromatin to the mitotic apparatus, playing moonlighting functions required for proper execution of cell division.
2022
chromatin remodeling; moonlighting proteins; cell division; cytokinesis; midbody
01 Pubblicazione su rivista::01a Articolo in rivista
Evolutionary conserved relocation of chromatin remodeling complexes to the mitotic apparatus / Messina, Giovanni; Prozzillo, Yuri; DELLE MONACHE, Francesca; Santopietro, MARIA VIRGINIA; Dimitri, Patrizio. - In: BMC BIOLOGY. - ISSN 1741-7007. - 20:(2022), pp. 1-21. [10.1186/s12915-022-01365-5]
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11573/1651744
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