The restriction measures adopted to control the COVID-19 pandemic had significant consequences on individuals’ lifestyles. This study is aimed at assessing the amount and type of habitual physical activity (PA) in older adults during the advanced phase of the pandemic and their possible relationships with sociodemographic aspects. A questionnaire that included sociodemographic characteristics and the Physical Activity Scale for the Elderly (PASE) was administered online to elderly subjects living in the Apulia region, South Italy. A sample of 939 participants (57.1% F; mean age 75.9 ± 6.3) was obtained. In total, 68.8% of female respondents reported a decrease in PA during the pandemic, while 55.1% of men maintained their previous levels (<0.001). The total PASE score did not differ between gender groups (median value 91.7 in males vs. 90.0 in females; p = 0.067). However, differences were registered in leisure activities, particularly regarding walking (23.8 ± 14.8 in males vs. 20.2 ± 14.6 in females; p = 0.001). Higher PA levels were related with lower age (OR 0.253; 95% CI 0.192–0.333; p = 0.001). Since inactivity can affect elderly health and wellbeing, and considering the impact of the COVID-19 lockdown on this habit, health promotion strategies to counteract the negative effects of the pandemic should include interventions aimed at increasing PA in this sub-group of the population, especially among women and elderly subjects

Capturing the Features of Physical Activity in Old Adults during the COVID-19 Pandemic: Results of an Italian Survey / Gallè, Francesca; Sabella, Elita Anna; Di Muzio, Marco; Barchielli, Benedetta; Da Molin, Giovanna; Ferracuti, Stefano; Liguori, Giorgio; Orsi, Giovanni Battista; Napoli, Christian. - In: INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH AND PUBLIC HEALTH. - ISSN 1660-4601. - 19:11(2022), p. 6868. [10.3390/ijerph19116868]

Capturing the Features of Physical Activity in Old Adults during the COVID-19 Pandemic: Results of an Italian Survey

Di Muzio, Marco;Barchielli, Benedetta;Ferracuti, Stefano;Orsi, Giovanni Battista;Napoli, Christian
2022

Abstract

The restriction measures adopted to control the COVID-19 pandemic had significant consequences on individuals’ lifestyles. This study is aimed at assessing the amount and type of habitual physical activity (PA) in older adults during the advanced phase of the pandemic and their possible relationships with sociodemographic aspects. A questionnaire that included sociodemographic characteristics and the Physical Activity Scale for the Elderly (PASE) was administered online to elderly subjects living in the Apulia region, South Italy. A sample of 939 participants (57.1% F; mean age 75.9 ± 6.3) was obtained. In total, 68.8% of female respondents reported a decrease in PA during the pandemic, while 55.1% of men maintained their previous levels (<0.001). The total PASE score did not differ between gender groups (median value 91.7 in males vs. 90.0 in females; p = 0.067). However, differences were registered in leisure activities, particularly regarding walking (23.8 ± 14.8 in males vs. 20.2 ± 14.6 in females; p = 0.001). Higher PA levels were related with lower age (OR 0.253; 95% CI 0.192–0.333; p = 0.001). Since inactivity can affect elderly health and wellbeing, and considering the impact of the COVID-19 lockdown on this habit, health promotion strategies to counteract the negative effects of the pandemic should include interventions aimed at increasing PA in this sub-group of the population, especially among women and elderly subjects
File allegati a questo prodotto
File Dimensione Formato  
Gallè_Capturing the Features of Physical Activity_2022.pdf

accesso aperto

Tipologia: Versione editoriale (versione pubblicata con il layout dell'editore)
Licenza: Creative commons
Dimensione 327.97 kB
Formato Adobe PDF
327.97 kB Adobe PDF Visualizza/Apri PDF

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11573/1639337
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus 1
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 1
social impact