Exposure to stress represents a well-known risk factor for psychiatric diseases. However, the timing of life stress may be important in determining its long-term outcomes. Growing evidence has demonstrated that experiencing early-life adverse events, especially in the prenatal and adolescent periods, can interfere with neurodevelopmental trajectories, which may result in altered vulnerability to stress-related disorders later in life. Literature data suggest that women present a greater risk to develop psychiatric diseases than men, and this seems to be influenced by the effects of sex hormones on the stress-response system. However, the mechanisms underlying these gender differences remain unclear due to the paucity of both clinical and preclinical studies carried out in female subjects. Therefore, in this talk I will discuss on how early-life adverse events might produce different stress-responses in male and female adult rats. In particular, I will present data demonstrating that early-life stressors (prenatal stress or repeated brief social isolation stress during early-adolescence) induced behavioral alterations on emotionality and cognitive functions in the long-term and that these effects are sex divergent. Thus, our findings are relevant to future research aimed not only at investigating sex-differences in the neurobiology of stress-related disorders, but also at evaluating pharmacological interventions to treat long-term alterations induced by early-life stressful events.

Enduring effects of early life stressors: the role of sex-differences / Mancini, GIULIA FEDERICA; Campolongo, Patrizia. - (2021). ((Intervento presentato al convegno NEURO2021 tenutosi a web conference.

Enduring effects of early life stressors: the role of sex-differences

Giulia Federica Mancini;
2021

Abstract

Exposure to stress represents a well-known risk factor for psychiatric diseases. However, the timing of life stress may be important in determining its long-term outcomes. Growing evidence has demonstrated that experiencing early-life adverse events, especially in the prenatal and adolescent periods, can interfere with neurodevelopmental trajectories, which may result in altered vulnerability to stress-related disorders later in life. Literature data suggest that women present a greater risk to develop psychiatric diseases than men, and this seems to be influenced by the effects of sex hormones on the stress-response system. However, the mechanisms underlying these gender differences remain unclear due to the paucity of both clinical and preclinical studies carried out in female subjects. Therefore, in this talk I will discuss on how early-life adverse events might produce different stress-responses in male and female adult rats. In particular, I will present data demonstrating that early-life stressors (prenatal stress or repeated brief social isolation stress during early-adolescence) induced behavioral alterations on emotionality and cognitive functions in the long-term and that these effects are sex divergent. Thus, our findings are relevant to future research aimed not only at investigating sex-differences in the neurobiology of stress-related disorders, but also at evaluating pharmacological interventions to treat long-term alterations induced by early-life stressful events.
NEURO2021
04 Pubblicazione in atti di convegno::04d Abstract in atti di convegno
Enduring effects of early life stressors: the role of sex-differences / Mancini, GIULIA FEDERICA; Campolongo, Patrizia. - (2021). ((Intervento presentato al convegno NEURO2021 tenutosi a web conference.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11573/1637435
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