Rock art is a widespread cultural heritage, representing an immovable element of the material culture created on natural rocky supports. Paintings and petroglyphs can be found within caves and rock shelters or in open-air contexts and for that reason they are not isolated from the processes acting at the Earth surface. Consequently, rock art represents a sort of ecosystem because it is part of the complex and multidirectional interplay between the host rock, pigments, environmental parameters, and microbial communities. Such complexity results in several processes affecting rock art; some of them contribute to its destruction, others to its preservation. To understand the effects of such processes an interdisciplinary scientific approach is needed. In this contribution, we discuss the many processes acting at the rock interface—where rock art is present—and the multifaceted possibilities of scientific investigations—non-invasive or invasive—offered by the STEM disciplines. Finally, we suggest a sustainable approach to investigating rock art allowing to understand its production as well as its preservation and eventually suggest strategies to mitigate the risks threatening its stability.

The sustainability of rock art: preservation and research / Zerboni, Andrea; Villa, Federica; Wu, Ying-Li; Solomon, Tadele; Trentini, Andrea; Rizzi, Alessandro; Cappitelli, Francesca; Gallinaro, Marina. - In: SUSTAINABILITY. - ISSN 2071-1050. - 14:10(2022), p. 6305. [10.3390/su14106305]

The sustainability of rock art: preservation and research

Zerboni, Andrea
;
Villa, Federica;Rizzi, Alessandro;Gallinaro, Marina
Conceptualization
2022

Abstract

Rock art is a widespread cultural heritage, representing an immovable element of the material culture created on natural rocky supports. Paintings and petroglyphs can be found within caves and rock shelters or in open-air contexts and for that reason they are not isolated from the processes acting at the Earth surface. Consequently, rock art represents a sort of ecosystem because it is part of the complex and multidirectional interplay between the host rock, pigments, environmental parameters, and microbial communities. Such complexity results in several processes affecting rock art; some of them contribute to its destruction, others to its preservation. To understand the effects of such processes an interdisciplinary scientific approach is needed. In this contribution, we discuss the many processes acting at the rock interface—where rock art is present—and the multifaceted possibilities of scientific investigations—non-invasive or invasive—offered by the STEM disciplines. Finally, we suggest a sustainable approach to investigating rock art allowing to understand its production as well as its preservation and eventually suggest strategies to mitigate the risks threatening its stability.
2022
rock art; sustainability; ecosystem; surface processes; non-invasive sampling; scientific analyses
01 Pubblicazione su rivista::01a Articolo in rivista
The sustainability of rock art: preservation and research / Zerboni, Andrea; Villa, Federica; Wu, Ying-Li; Solomon, Tadele; Trentini, Andrea; Rizzi, Alessandro; Cappitelli, Francesca; Gallinaro, Marina. - In: SUSTAINABILITY. - ISSN 2071-1050. - 14:10(2022), p. 6305. [10.3390/su14106305]
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11573/1637157
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