Syphilis is a chronic systemic infectious disease caused by the spirochaete bacterium Treponema pallidum(syphilis treponeme). In recent decades there has been a drastic increase in cases of syphilis,with a relative increase in scientific interest in this regard. However, the data concerning the studyof microbiota in syphilis are few and very scattered.This brief review provides a quick update on the disease, with particular attention to the role of themicrobiota, an aspect not always adequately considered in the evaluation of the pathology. The usualcoexistence of different sexually transmitted diseases in the same patients led us to delve also intothe possible role of the microbiota in the pathogenesis of syphilis; indeed, not all sexual contactslead to infections, suggesting that host immunity and local microbiota could modulate the historyof sexually transmitted disease. In both males and females, alteration of the microbiota may be involvedin syphilis as well as in the other sexually transmitted diseases. Finally, since 9% of the totalproteome of T. pallidum is spent for transportome, the latter may provide essential nutrients, makingT. pallidum able to adapt to a diverse range of microenvironments and stresses in the human host.

Syphilis: a mini review of the history, epidemiology and focus on microbiota / Mercuri, Sr; Moliterni, E; Cerullo, A; Di Nicola, Mr; Rizzo, N; Bianchi, Vg; Paolino, G. - In: NEW MICROBIOLOGICA. - ISSN 1121-7138. - 45:1(2022), pp. 28-34.

Syphilis: a mini review of the history, epidemiology and focus on microbiota

Moliterni E
Secondo
;
Paolino G
Ultimo
2022

Abstract

Syphilis is a chronic systemic infectious disease caused by the spirochaete bacterium Treponema pallidum(syphilis treponeme). In recent decades there has been a drastic increase in cases of syphilis,with a relative increase in scientific interest in this regard. However, the data concerning the studyof microbiota in syphilis are few and very scattered.This brief review provides a quick update on the disease, with particular attention to the role of themicrobiota, an aspect not always adequately considered in the evaluation of the pathology. The usualcoexistence of different sexually transmitted diseases in the same patients led us to delve also intothe possible role of the microbiota in the pathogenesis of syphilis; indeed, not all sexual contactslead to infections, suggesting that host immunity and local microbiota could modulate the historyof sexually transmitted disease. In both males and females, alteration of the microbiota may be involvedin syphilis as well as in the other sexually transmitted diseases. Finally, since 9% of the totalproteome of T. pallidum is spent for transportome, the latter may provide essential nutrients, makingT. pallidum able to adapt to a diverse range of microenvironments and stresses in the human host.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11573/1630564
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