Objectives: Breastfeeding up to 2-years has been associated with short and long-term health benefits for both newborns and mothers. However, few women breastfeed up to 2-years after birth. This study extends previous research on the theory of planned behaviour (TPB) examining the predictors of intention and maintenance of breastfeeding up to 2-years in both primiparous and multiparous women. Design: 155 pregnant women participated in this longitudinal study. Methods: Expectant mothers completed a questionnaire and then 2-years after the child’s birth were asked to report breastfeeding behaviour. Interactions among parity and TPB constructs were examined. Results: Attitudes, descriptive and injunctive norms, and perceived behavioural control (PBC) explained 58% of the variance in mothers’ intention to breastfeed. Attitudes were the strongest predictor, followed by PBC, descriptive norms and parity. A significant interaction was found between parity and PBC, showing that PBC was only a significant predictor of intention to breastfeed at 2-years in multiparous women. Intentions predicted breastfeeding behaviour at 2-years. Conclusion: Promoting intentions may be a useful way to increase breastfeeding duration to 2-years and targeting attitudes and norms may be one way to increase intentions. Further, targeting PBC may also be useful to increase intentions, but only in multiparous women.

Predicting intention and maintenance of breastfeeding up to 2-years after birth in primiparous and multiparous women / Grano, Caterina; Mariana, Fernandes; Conner, Mark. - In: PSYCHOLOGY & HEALTH. - ISSN 0887-0446. - (2022). [10.1080/08870446.2021.2025374]

Predicting intention and maintenance of breastfeeding up to 2-years after birth in primiparous and multiparous women

caterina Grano;Mariana Fernandes
Secondo
Membro del Collaboration Group
;
2022

Abstract

Objectives: Breastfeeding up to 2-years has been associated with short and long-term health benefits for both newborns and mothers. However, few women breastfeed up to 2-years after birth. This study extends previous research on the theory of planned behaviour (TPB) examining the predictors of intention and maintenance of breastfeeding up to 2-years in both primiparous and multiparous women. Design: 155 pregnant women participated in this longitudinal study. Methods: Expectant mothers completed a questionnaire and then 2-years after the child’s birth were asked to report breastfeeding behaviour. Interactions among parity and TPB constructs were examined. Results: Attitudes, descriptive and injunctive norms, and perceived behavioural control (PBC) explained 58% of the variance in mothers’ intention to breastfeed. Attitudes were the strongest predictor, followed by PBC, descriptive norms and parity. A significant interaction was found between parity and PBC, showing that PBC was only a significant predictor of intention to breastfeed at 2-years in multiparous women. Intentions predicted breastfeeding behaviour at 2-years. Conclusion: Promoting intentions may be a useful way to increase breastfeeding duration to 2-years and targeting attitudes and norms may be one way to increase intentions. Further, targeting PBC may also be useful to increase intentions, but only in multiparous women.
2022
breastfeeding; clinical and health psychology; parity; pregnancy; Theory of planned behaviour
01 Pubblicazione su rivista::01a Articolo in rivista
Predicting intention and maintenance of breastfeeding up to 2-years after birth in primiparous and multiparous women / Grano, Caterina; Mariana, Fernandes; Conner, Mark. - In: PSYCHOLOGY & HEALTH. - ISSN 0887-0446. - (2022). [10.1080/08870446.2021.2025374]
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11573/1624736
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