Microgravity impairs tissue organization and critical pathways involved in the cell–microenvironment interplay, where fibroblasts have a critical role. We exposed dermal fibroblasts to simulated microgravity by means of a Random Positioning Machine (RPM), a device that reproduces conditions of weightlessness. Molecular and structural changes were analyzed and compared to control samples growing in a normal gravity field. Simulated microgravity impairs fibroblast conversion into myofibroblast and inhibits their migratory properties. Consequently, the normal interplay between fibroblasts and keratinocytes were remarkably altered in 3D co-culture experiments, giving rise to several ultra-structural abnormalities. Such phenotypic changes are associated with down-regulation of α-SMA that translocate in the nucleoplasm, altogether with the concomitant modification of the actin-vinculin apparatus. Noticeably, the stress associated with weightlessness induced oxidative damage, which seemed to concur with such modifications. These findings disclose new opportunities to establish antioxidant strategies that counteract the microgravity-induced disruptive effects on fibroblasts and tissue organization.

Microgravity modifies the phenotype of fibroblast and promotes remodeling of the fibroblast–keratinocyte interaction in a 3D co-culture model / Fedeli, Valeria; Cucina, Alessandra; Dinicola, Simona; Fabrizi, Gianmarco; Catizone, Angiolina; Gesualdi, Luisa; Ceccarelli, Simona; Halim Harrath, Abdel; Alwasel, Saleh H.; Ricci, Giulia; Pedata, Paola; Bizzarri, Mariano; Monti, Noemi. - In: INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MOLECULAR SCIENCES. - ISSN 1422-0067. - 23:4(2022), pp. 1-22. [10.3390/ijms23042163]

Microgravity modifies the phenotype of fibroblast and promotes remodeling of the fibroblast–keratinocyte interaction in a 3D co-culture model

Valeria Fedeli;Alessandra Cucina;Simona Dinicola;Gianmarco Fabrizi;Angela Catizone;Luisa Gesualdi;Simona Ceccarelli;Mariano Bizzarri;Noemi Monti
2022

Abstract

Microgravity impairs tissue organization and critical pathways involved in the cell–microenvironment interplay, where fibroblasts have a critical role. We exposed dermal fibroblasts to simulated microgravity by means of a Random Positioning Machine (RPM), a device that reproduces conditions of weightlessness. Molecular and structural changes were analyzed and compared to control samples growing in a normal gravity field. Simulated microgravity impairs fibroblast conversion into myofibroblast and inhibits their migratory properties. Consequently, the normal interplay between fibroblasts and keratinocytes were remarkably altered in 3D co-culture experiments, giving rise to several ultra-structural abnormalities. Such phenotypic changes are associated with down-regulation of α-SMA that translocate in the nucleoplasm, altogether with the concomitant modification of the actin-vinculin apparatus. Noticeably, the stress associated with weightlessness induced oxidative damage, which seemed to concur with such modifications. These findings disclose new opportunities to establish antioxidant strategies that counteract the microgravity-induced disruptive effects on fibroblasts and tissue organization.
2022
microgravity; fibroblasts; myofibroblasts; cytoskeleton; α-SMA; keratinocytes; co-culture
01 Pubblicazione su rivista::01a Articolo in rivista
Microgravity modifies the phenotype of fibroblast and promotes remodeling of the fibroblast–keratinocyte interaction in a 3D co-culture model / Fedeli, Valeria; Cucina, Alessandra; Dinicola, Simona; Fabrizi, Gianmarco; Catizone, Angiolina; Gesualdi, Luisa; Ceccarelli, Simona; Halim Harrath, Abdel; Alwasel, Saleh H.; Ricci, Giulia; Pedata, Paola; Bizzarri, Mariano; Monti, Noemi. - In: INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MOLECULAR SCIENCES. - ISSN 1422-0067. - 23:4(2022), pp. 1-22. [10.3390/ijms23042163]
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11573/1617836
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