Purpose: A long-lasting remission of acromegaly after somatostatin analogues (SAs) withdrawal has been described in some series. Our aim was to update the disease evolution after SAs withdrawal in a cohort of acromegalic patients. Methods: We retrospectively evaluated 21 acromegalic patients previously included in a multicentre study (Ronchi et al. 2008), updating data at the last follow-up. We added further 8 patients selected for SAs withdrawal between 2008–2018. Pituitary irradiation represented an exclusion criterion. The withdrawal was suggested after at least 9 months of clinical and hormonal disease control. Clinical and biochemical data prior and after SAs withdrawal were analysed. Results: In the whole cohort (29 patients) mean age was 50 ± 14.9 years and 72.4% were females. In 69% pituitary surgery was previously performed. Overall, the median time of treatment before SAs withdrawal was 53 months (IQR = 24–84). At the last follow up in 2019, 23/29 patients (79.3%) had a disease relapse after a median time of 6 months (interquartile range or IQR = 3–12) from the drug suspension, while 6/29 (20.7%) were still on remission after 120 months (IQR = 66–150). IGF-1 levels were significantly lower before withdrawal in patients with persistent remission compared to relapsing ones (IGF-1 SDS: -1.5 ± 0.6 vs -0.11 ± 1, p = 0.01). We did not observe any other difference between patients with and without relapse, including SAs formulation, dosage and treatment duration. Conclusion: A successful withdrawal of SAs is possible in a subset of well-controlled acromegalic patients and it challenges the concept that medical therapy is a lifelong requirement.

Long-term remission of acromegaly after somatostatin analogues withdrawal: a single-centre experience / Sala, E.; Carosi, G.; Del Sindaco, G.; Mungari, R.; Cremaschi, A.; Serban, A. L.; Ronchi, C. L.; Ferrante, E.; Arosio, M.; Mantovani, G.. - In: JOURNAL OF ENDOCRINOLOGICAL INVESTIGATION. - ISSN 0391-4097. - 44:12(2021), pp. 2593-2599. [10.1007/s40618-021-01562-z]

Long-term remission of acromegaly after somatostatin analogues withdrawal: a single-centre experience

Carosi G.;Serban A. L.;
2021

Abstract

Purpose: A long-lasting remission of acromegaly after somatostatin analogues (SAs) withdrawal has been described in some series. Our aim was to update the disease evolution after SAs withdrawal in a cohort of acromegalic patients. Methods: We retrospectively evaluated 21 acromegalic patients previously included in a multicentre study (Ronchi et al. 2008), updating data at the last follow-up. We added further 8 patients selected for SAs withdrawal between 2008–2018. Pituitary irradiation represented an exclusion criterion. The withdrawal was suggested after at least 9 months of clinical and hormonal disease control. Clinical and biochemical data prior and after SAs withdrawal were analysed. Results: In the whole cohort (29 patients) mean age was 50 ± 14.9 years and 72.4% were females. In 69% pituitary surgery was previously performed. Overall, the median time of treatment before SAs withdrawal was 53 months (IQR = 24–84). At the last follow up in 2019, 23/29 patients (79.3%) had a disease relapse after a median time of 6 months (interquartile range or IQR = 3–12) from the drug suspension, while 6/29 (20.7%) were still on remission after 120 months (IQR = 66–150). IGF-1 levels were significantly lower before withdrawal in patients with persistent remission compared to relapsing ones (IGF-1 SDS: -1.5 ± 0.6 vs -0.11 ± 1, p = 0.01). We did not observe any other difference between patients with and without relapse, including SAs formulation, dosage and treatment duration. Conclusion: A successful withdrawal of SAs is possible in a subset of well-controlled acromegalic patients and it challenges the concept that medical therapy is a lifelong requirement.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11573/1615495
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