During an acute cardiac event, Takotsubo Syndrome (TTS) and Acute Coronary Syndrome (ACS) apparently share very similar clinical characteristics. Since only a few inconsistent studies have evaluated the psychological features that characterize these different patients, the aim of the present explorative research was to investigate if post-recovery TTS and ACS patients present different psychological profiles. We also investigated whether the occurrence of acute psychological stressful episodes that had occurred prior to the cardiac event could be found in either syndrome. Twenty TTS and twenty ACS female patients were recruited. All patients completed self-report questionnaires about anxiety and depressive symptoms, perceived stress, type-D personality and post-traumatic symptoms. Results showed that only three subscales of health anxiety (i.e., Fear of Death/Diseases, Interference and Reassurance) significantly differed between the two groups, while no differences were found in the other psychological measurements. Moreover, personality traits seem to not be associated with the impact of the cardiac traumatic event. Finally, only TTS patients reported the presence of a significant emotional trigger preceding the acute cardiac event. In conclusion, post-recovery TTS patients differ from ACS patients in their level of concern about their health and in their need of reassurance and information only, probably as a result of the different clinical characteristics of the two illnesses.

Psychological Characteristics of Patients with Takotsubo Syndrome and Patients with Acute Coronary Syndrome: An Explorative Study toward a Better Personalized Care / Gorini, A.; Galli, F.; Giuliani, M.; Pierobon, A.; Werba, J. P.; Adriano, E. P.; Trabattoni, D.. - In: JOURNAL OF PERSONALIZED MEDICINE. - ISSN 2075-4426. - 12:1(2022), p. 38. [10.3390/jpm12010038]

Psychological Characteristics of Patients with Takotsubo Syndrome and Patients with Acute Coronary Syndrome: An Explorative Study toward a Better Personalized Care

Galli F.
Secondo
;
2022

Abstract

During an acute cardiac event, Takotsubo Syndrome (TTS) and Acute Coronary Syndrome (ACS) apparently share very similar clinical characteristics. Since only a few inconsistent studies have evaluated the psychological features that characterize these different patients, the aim of the present explorative research was to investigate if post-recovery TTS and ACS patients present different psychological profiles. We also investigated whether the occurrence of acute psychological stressful episodes that had occurred prior to the cardiac event could be found in either syndrome. Twenty TTS and twenty ACS female patients were recruited. All patients completed self-report questionnaires about anxiety and depressive symptoms, perceived stress, type-D personality and post-traumatic symptoms. Results showed that only three subscales of health anxiety (i.e., Fear of Death/Diseases, Interference and Reassurance) significantly differed between the two groups, while no differences were found in the other psychological measurements. Moreover, personality traits seem to not be associated with the impact of the cardiac traumatic event. Finally, only TTS patients reported the presence of a significant emotional trigger preceding the acute cardiac event. In conclusion, post-recovery TTS patients differ from ACS patients in their level of concern about their health and in their need of reassurance and information only, probably as a result of the different clinical characteristics of the two illnesses.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11573/1607050
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