Objective: To evaluate the prevalence of omental infarction (OI) in children with suspected appendicitis, the role of ultrasonography (US) in its diagnosis and management and the efficacy of conservative management. Methods: Consecutive children with suspected acute appendicitis were prospectively enrolled. Ultrasonography was performed at baseline, during follow-up, before the discharge, and at 15-day intervals until US findings of OI disappeared. All children with a diagnosis of OI were treated conservatively. Results: One hundred ninety-nine children (91 male; age range, 3–15 years) were evaluated. Eighty-four patients had acute appendicitis. Omental infarctions were found in 14 children (8 male; mean age, 9.8 ± 2.6 years), with an incidence of 7%. Ultrasonography depicted an echogenic mass consistent with OI in all children. Ultrasonography detected in 8 patients a normal-looking appendix, whereas in other 6 patients, it identified neither appendix nor indirect signs of acute appendicitis. A normal appendix has been detected by US during follow-up in 2 of these 6 patients. During follow-up, US finding of OI disappeared in all cases and no signs of acute appendicitis or other disease occurred. All 14 OIs were treated conservatively, with no reported complications. Conclusions: Omental infarction is an underestimated cause of abdominal pain in children accounting for 7% of patients with suspected appendicitis. Ultrasonography is a useful method for the diagnoses and to guide clinical management of OI. Conservative therapy is a safe option for the management of OI.

Omental infarction an underrecognized cause of right-sided acute abdominal pain in children / Di Nardo, G.; Di Serafino, M.; Gaglione, G.; Mercogliano, C.; Masoni, L.; Villa, M. P.; Parisi, P.; Ziparo, C.; Vassallo, F.; Evangelisti, M.; Vallone, G.; Esposito, F.. - In: PEDIATRIC EMERGENCY CARE. - ISSN 0749-5161. - 37:12(2021), pp. e1555-e1559. [10.1097/PEC.0000000000002114]

Omental infarction an underrecognized cause of right-sided acute abdominal pain in children

Di Nardo G.
Writing – Review & Editing
;
Masoni L.;Villa M. P.;Parisi P.;Ziparo C.;Vassallo F.;Evangelisti M.;
2021

Abstract

Objective: To evaluate the prevalence of omental infarction (OI) in children with suspected appendicitis, the role of ultrasonography (US) in its diagnosis and management and the efficacy of conservative management. Methods: Consecutive children with suspected acute appendicitis were prospectively enrolled. Ultrasonography was performed at baseline, during follow-up, before the discharge, and at 15-day intervals until US findings of OI disappeared. All children with a diagnosis of OI were treated conservatively. Results: One hundred ninety-nine children (91 male; age range, 3–15 years) were evaluated. Eighty-four patients had acute appendicitis. Omental infarctions were found in 14 children (8 male; mean age, 9.8 ± 2.6 years), with an incidence of 7%. Ultrasonography depicted an echogenic mass consistent with OI in all children. Ultrasonography detected in 8 patients a normal-looking appendix, whereas in other 6 patients, it identified neither appendix nor indirect signs of acute appendicitis. A normal appendix has been detected by US during follow-up in 2 of these 6 patients. During follow-up, US finding of OI disappeared in all cases and no signs of acute appendicitis or other disease occurred. All 14 OIs were treated conservatively, with no reported complications. Conclusions: Omental infarction is an underestimated cause of abdominal pain in children accounting for 7% of patients with suspected appendicitis. Ultrasonography is a useful method for the diagnoses and to guide clinical management of OI. Conservative therapy is a safe option for the management of OI.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11573/1596135
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