Astronauts on board the International Space Station (ISS) are exposed to the damaging effects of microgravity and cosmic radiation. One of the most critical and sensitive districts of an organism is the eye, particularly the retina, and > 50% of astronauts develop a complex of alterations designated as spaceflight-associated neuro-ocular syndrome. However, the pathogenesis of this condition is not clearly understood. In the current study, we aimed to explore the cellular and molecular effects induced in the human retinal pigment ARPE-19 cell line by their transfer to and 3-day stay on board the ISS in the context of an experiment funded by the Agenzia Spaziale Italiana. Treatment of cells on board the ISS with the well-known bioenergetic, antioxidant, and antiapoptotic coenzyme Q10 was also evaluated. In the ground control experiment, the cells were exposed to the same conditions as on the ISS, with the exception of microgravity and radiation. The transfer of ARPE-19 retinal cells to the ISS and their living on board for 3 days did not affect cell viability or apoptosis but induced cytoskeleton remodeling consisting of vimentin redistribution from the cellular boundaries to the perinuclear area, underlining the collapse of the network of intermediate vimentin filaments under unloading conditions. The morphological changes endured by ARPE-19 cells grown on board the ISS were associated with changes in the transcriptomic profile related to the cellular response to the space environment and were consistent with cell dysfunction adaptations. In addition, the results obtained from ARPE-19 cells treated with coenzyme Q10 indicated its potential to increase cell resistance to damage.

Effect of space flight on the behavior of human retinal pigment epithelial ARPE-19 cells and evaluation of coenzyme Q10 treatment / Cialdai, F.; Bolognini, D.; Vignali, L.; Iannotti, N.; Cacchione, S.; Magi, A.; Balsamo, M.; Vukich, M.; Neri, G.; Donati, A.; Monici, M.; Capaccioli, S.; Lulli, M.. - In: CELLULAR AND MOLECULAR LIFE SCIENCES. - ISSN 1420-682X. - 78:(2021), pp. 7795-7812. [10.1007/s00018-021-03989-2]

Effect of space flight on the behavior of human retinal pigment epithelial ARPE-19 cells and evaluation of coenzyme Q10 treatment

Cacchione S.;
2021

Abstract

Astronauts on board the International Space Station (ISS) are exposed to the damaging effects of microgravity and cosmic radiation. One of the most critical and sensitive districts of an organism is the eye, particularly the retina, and > 50% of astronauts develop a complex of alterations designated as spaceflight-associated neuro-ocular syndrome. However, the pathogenesis of this condition is not clearly understood. In the current study, we aimed to explore the cellular and molecular effects induced in the human retinal pigment ARPE-19 cell line by their transfer to and 3-day stay on board the ISS in the context of an experiment funded by the Agenzia Spaziale Italiana. Treatment of cells on board the ISS with the well-known bioenergetic, antioxidant, and antiapoptotic coenzyme Q10 was also evaluated. In the ground control experiment, the cells were exposed to the same conditions as on the ISS, with the exception of microgravity and radiation. The transfer of ARPE-19 retinal cells to the ISS and their living on board for 3 days did not affect cell viability or apoptosis but induced cytoskeleton remodeling consisting of vimentin redistribution from the cellular boundaries to the perinuclear area, underlining the collapse of the network of intermediate vimentin filaments under unloading conditions. The morphological changes endured by ARPE-19 cells grown on board the ISS were associated with changes in the transcriptomic profile related to the cellular response to the space environment and were consistent with cell dysfunction adaptations. In addition, the results obtained from ARPE-19 cells treated with coenzyme Q10 indicated its potential to increase cell resistance to damage.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11573/1587486
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