Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are associated with invasive malignancies, including almost 100% of cervical cancers (CECs), and 35–70% of oropharyngeal cancers (OPCs). HPV infection leads to clinical implications in related tumors by determining better prognosis and predicting treatment response, especially in OPC. Currently, specific and minimally invasive tests allow for detecting HPV-related cancer at an early phase, informing more appropriately therapeutical decisions, and allowing for timely disease monitoring. A blood-based biomarker detectable in liquid biopsy represents an ideal candidate, and the use of circulating HPV DNA (ct-DNA) itself could offer the highest specificity for such a scope. Circulating HPV DNA is detectable in the greatest part of patients affected by HPV-related cancers, and studies have demonstrated its potential usefulness for CEC and OPC clinical management. Unfortunately, when using conventional polymerase chain reaction (PCR), the detection rate of serum HPV DNA is low. Innovative techniques such as droplet-based digital PCR and next generation sequencing are becoming increasingly available for the purpose of boosting HPV ct-DNA detection rate. We herein review and critically discuss the most recent and representative literature, concerning the role of HPV ctDNA in OPC and CEC in the light of new technologies that could improve the potential of this biomarker in fulfilling many of the unmet needs in the clinical management of OPC and CEC patients.

Circulating hpv dna in the management of oropharyngeal and cervical cancers: Current knowledge and future perspectives / Krasniqi, E.; Barba, M.; Venuti, A.; Pizzuti, L.; Cappuzzo, F.; Landi, L.; Carpano, S.; Marchetti, P.; Villa, A.; Vizza, E.; Giuliano, G.; Mazzotta, M.; Marinelli, D.; Gnignera, S.; Vincenzoni, C.; Stranges, V.; Sergi, D.; Giordano, A.; Tomao, F.; Maugeri-Sacca, M.; Sanguineti, G.; Di Lisa, F. S.; Tomao, S.; Ciliberto, G.; Vici, P.. - In: JOURNAL OF CLINICAL MEDICINE. - ISSN 2077-0383. - 10:7(2021), p. 1525. [10.3390/jcm10071525]

Circulating hpv dna in the management of oropharyngeal and cervical cancers: current knowledge and future perspectives

Barba M.
Secondo
;
Pizzuti L.;Marchetti P.;Villa A.;Mazzotta M.;Marinelli D.;Sergi D.;Tomao F.;Di Lisa F. S.;Tomao S.;
2021

Abstract

Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are associated with invasive malignancies, including almost 100% of cervical cancers (CECs), and 35–70% of oropharyngeal cancers (OPCs). HPV infection leads to clinical implications in related tumors by determining better prognosis and predicting treatment response, especially in OPC. Currently, specific and minimally invasive tests allow for detecting HPV-related cancer at an early phase, informing more appropriately therapeutical decisions, and allowing for timely disease monitoring. A blood-based biomarker detectable in liquid biopsy represents an ideal candidate, and the use of circulating HPV DNA (ct-DNA) itself could offer the highest specificity for such a scope. Circulating HPV DNA is detectable in the greatest part of patients affected by HPV-related cancers, and studies have demonstrated its potential usefulness for CEC and OPC clinical management. Unfortunately, when using conventional polymerase chain reaction (PCR), the detection rate of serum HPV DNA is low. Innovative techniques such as droplet-based digital PCR and next generation sequencing are becoming increasingly available for the purpose of boosting HPV ct-DNA detection rate. We herein review and critically discuss the most recent and representative literature, concerning the role of HPV ctDNA in OPC and CEC in the light of new technologies that could improve the potential of this biomarker in fulfilling many of the unmet needs in the clinical management of OPC and CEC patients.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11573/1582766
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