This work outlines a comprehensive study of groundwater resources supply in Mozambique’s Great Limpopo National Park buffer zone in Southern Africa. To protect biological diversity and the water resources supply of dispersed communities of the buffer zone is a crucial problem to fix people in the region and, in the meantime, to boost the development of the Limpopo National Park. This work shows the current state of knowledge about this topic and try to point out some suggestions on technical solutions. Some previous studies concluded that two different main factors make a complex water supply in this area: (I) the rainwater distribution, it is hard to transform the rainwater into groundwater resources available for exploitation, and (ii) the common groundwater resources, rich in elements such as Boron (B), Mercury (Hg), Uranium (U), Zinc (Zn) and Lead (Pb). The occurrence of these elements is linked to the presence of groundwater with long residence times, unsafe for people’s health. The methodological approach adopted has been to assess the potential infiltration, applying the inverse hydrogeological budget technique, starting from the main outcropping geological units, in the study area. Due to the lack of meteorological data referred to Limpopo National Park, the gauge stations located in the Kruger National Park during the last 64 years have been, on the whole, considered. The target of the study has been to assess the trend of meteorological data and understand how precipitations could affect groundwater recharge and their availability. Without a strategy of biodiversity conservation and sustainable water resources management, they cannot be reached and guaranteed healthy conditions for local dispersed communities. A hydrogeoethical responsible approach is essential to protect biological diversity and hydrosocial cycle framework with integrative ecosystem services and nature-based solutions.

Climate change and groundwater resources availability in the Great Limpopo National Park (Mozambique): the current state of knowledge / Vitale, S.; Sappa, G.; Andrei, F.; Barbieri, M.. - In: MEDITERRANEAN GEOSCIENCE REVIEWS. - ISSN 2661-863X. - (2021). [10.1007/s42990-021-00067-4]

Climate change and groundwater resources availability in the Great Limpopo National Park (Mozambique): the current state of knowledge

Vitale, S.
Primo
Writing – Original Draft Preparation
;
Sappa, G.
Secondo
Project Administration
;
Andrei, F.
Penultimo
Data Curation
;
Barbieri, M.
Ultimo
Validation
2021

Abstract

This work outlines a comprehensive study of groundwater resources supply in Mozambique’s Great Limpopo National Park buffer zone in Southern Africa. To protect biological diversity and the water resources supply of dispersed communities of the buffer zone is a crucial problem to fix people in the region and, in the meantime, to boost the development of the Limpopo National Park. This work shows the current state of knowledge about this topic and try to point out some suggestions on technical solutions. Some previous studies concluded that two different main factors make a complex water supply in this area: (I) the rainwater distribution, it is hard to transform the rainwater into groundwater resources available for exploitation, and (ii) the common groundwater resources, rich in elements such as Boron (B), Mercury (Hg), Uranium (U), Zinc (Zn) and Lead (Pb). The occurrence of these elements is linked to the presence of groundwater with long residence times, unsafe for people’s health. The methodological approach adopted has been to assess the potential infiltration, applying the inverse hydrogeological budget technique, starting from the main outcropping geological units, in the study area. Due to the lack of meteorological data referred to Limpopo National Park, the gauge stations located in the Kruger National Park during the last 64 years have been, on the whole, considered. The target of the study has been to assess the trend of meteorological data and understand how precipitations could affect groundwater recharge and their availability. Without a strategy of biodiversity conservation and sustainable water resources management, they cannot be reached and guaranteed healthy conditions for local dispersed communities. A hydrogeoethical responsible approach is essential to protect biological diversity and hydrosocial cycle framework with integrative ecosystem services and nature-based solutions.
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Note: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s42990-021-00067-4
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11573/1582336
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