Miocene is a key interval in the global climate evolution as well as in the geodynamic evolution of the Mediterranean basin. Therefore, global and regional factors controlled Miocene Mediterranean oceanography, which, in turn, affected carbonate production. In this work, we review the Miocene paleocenographic evolution of the Mediterranean starting from its Sr and Nd isotope records. Secondly, we discuss Mediterranean shallow-water carbonate production changes to identify the role of oceanographic conditions in controlling carbonate systems' evolution. During Aquitanian, Sr and Nd isotope records attest an open Mediterranean, mainly fed by the Indian Ocean. From the late Burdigalian, the intermittent connection with the Indian Ocean changed the overall circulation in the basin, leading to higher residence time of waters and smaller water exchanges with the adjacent oceans. In this newly established paleoceanographic framework, regional factors such as volcanism, significantly affected Mediterranean seawater chemistry. Local tectonics led to the development of small sub-basins in the Eastern Mediterranean, characterized by restricted water exchanges from the Tortonian in the easternmost part, to the early Messinian, as attested by the deviation of the Sr isotope record of the proto-Adriatic basin. Larger Benthic Foraminifera (LBF) assemblages dominated carbonate production in the Aquitanian, while they were the most affected by the Indo-Pacific closure, showing a demise after the Burdigalian. With the LBF demise, red algae and bryozoans dominated carbonate ramps from the middle Miocene to the Tortonian. Bryozoans in particular spread during the Monterey Event, favoured by global and regional factors. During early to middle Miocene, corals formed mounds in the oligophotic zone or coral carpets controlled by local conditions. Conversely, in the late Tortonian-early Messinian, they developed as huge reef complexes in the Western and Central Mediterranean, with the exception of small restricted sub-basins, such as the proto-Adriatic basin, where red algae and small benthic foraminifera persisted.

Miocene paleoceanographic evolution of the Mediterranean area and carbonate production changes. A review / Cornacchia, I.; Brandano, M.; Agostini, S.. - In: EARTH-SCIENCE REVIEWS. - ISSN 0012-8252. - 221:(2021). [10.1016/j.earscirev.2021.103785]

Miocene paleoceanographic evolution of the Mediterranean area and carbonate production changes. A review

Brandano M.;
2021

Abstract

Miocene is a key interval in the global climate evolution as well as in the geodynamic evolution of the Mediterranean basin. Therefore, global and regional factors controlled Miocene Mediterranean oceanography, which, in turn, affected carbonate production. In this work, we review the Miocene paleocenographic evolution of the Mediterranean starting from its Sr and Nd isotope records. Secondly, we discuss Mediterranean shallow-water carbonate production changes to identify the role of oceanographic conditions in controlling carbonate systems' evolution. During Aquitanian, Sr and Nd isotope records attest an open Mediterranean, mainly fed by the Indian Ocean. From the late Burdigalian, the intermittent connection with the Indian Ocean changed the overall circulation in the basin, leading to higher residence time of waters and smaller water exchanges with the adjacent oceans. In this newly established paleoceanographic framework, regional factors such as volcanism, significantly affected Mediterranean seawater chemistry. Local tectonics led to the development of small sub-basins in the Eastern Mediterranean, characterized by restricted water exchanges from the Tortonian in the easternmost part, to the early Messinian, as attested by the deviation of the Sr isotope record of the proto-Adriatic basin. Larger Benthic Foraminifera (LBF) assemblages dominated carbonate production in the Aquitanian, while they were the most affected by the Indo-Pacific closure, showing a demise after the Burdigalian. With the LBF demise, red algae and bryozoans dominated carbonate ramps from the middle Miocene to the Tortonian. Bryozoans in particular spread during the Monterey Event, favoured by global and regional factors. During early to middle Miocene, corals formed mounds in the oligophotic zone or coral carpets controlled by local conditions. Conversely, in the late Tortonian-early Messinian, they developed as huge reef complexes in the Western and Central Mediterranean, with the exception of small restricted sub-basins, such as the proto-Adriatic basin, where red algae and small benthic foraminifera persisted.
2021
Carbonate platforms; Mediterranean; Miocene; Nd isotopes; paleoceanography; Sr isotopes
01 Pubblicazione su rivista::01a Articolo in rivista
Miocene paleoceanographic evolution of the Mediterranean area and carbonate production changes. A review / Cornacchia, I.; Brandano, M.; Agostini, S.. - In: EARTH-SCIENCE REVIEWS. - ISSN 0012-8252. - 221:(2021). [10.1016/j.earscirev.2021.103785]
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11573/1573742
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