Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most aggressive form of glioma tumor in adult brain. Among the numerous factors responsible for GBM cell proliferation and invasion, neurotransmitters such as dopamine, serotonin and glutamate can play key roles. Studies performed in mice housed in germ‐free (GF) conditions demonstrated the relevance of the gut‐brain axis in a number of physiological and pathological conditions. The gut–brain communication is made possible by vagal/nervous and blood/lymphatic routes and pave the way for reciprocal modulation of functions. The gut microbiota produces and consumes a wide range of molecules, including neurotransmitters (dopamine, norepinephrine, serotonin, gamma‐aminobutyric acid [GABA], and glutamate) that reach their cellular targets through the bloodstream. Growing evidence in animals suggests that modulation of these neurotransmitters by the microbiota impacts host neurophysiology and behavior, and affects neural cell progenitors and glial cells, along with having effects on tumor cell growth. In this review we propose a new perspective connecting neurotransmitter modulation by gut microbiota to glioma progression.

Neuro‐signals from gut microbiota: perspectives for brain glioma / D'alessandro, G.; Lauro, C.; Quaglio, D.; Ghirga, F.; Botta, B.; Trettel, F.; Limatola, C.. - In: CANCERS. - ISSN 2072-6694. - 13:11(2021). [10.3390/cancers13112810]

Neuro‐signals from gut microbiota: perspectives for brain glioma

D'alessandro G.;Lauro C.;Quaglio D.;Ghirga F.;Botta B.;Trettel F.;Limatola C.
2021

Abstract

Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most aggressive form of glioma tumor in adult brain. Among the numerous factors responsible for GBM cell proliferation and invasion, neurotransmitters such as dopamine, serotonin and glutamate can play key roles. Studies performed in mice housed in germ‐free (GF) conditions demonstrated the relevance of the gut‐brain axis in a number of physiological and pathological conditions. The gut–brain communication is made possible by vagal/nervous and blood/lymphatic routes and pave the way for reciprocal modulation of functions. The gut microbiota produces and consumes a wide range of molecules, including neurotransmitters (dopamine, norepinephrine, serotonin, gamma‐aminobutyric acid [GABA], and glutamate) that reach their cellular targets through the bloodstream. Growing evidence in animals suggests that modulation of these neurotransmitters by the microbiota impacts host neurophysiology and behavior, and affects neural cell progenitors and glial cells, along with having effects on tumor cell growth. In this review we propose a new perspective connecting neurotransmitter modulation by gut microbiota to glioma progression.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11573/1563867
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