Endometriosis is a chronic inflammatory disease that affects approximately 10% of women of reproductive age. Its clinical manifestations are highly heterogeneous, but pelvic pain is the most frequent, causing functional disability. Cyclic or acyclic chronic pelvic pain (CPP), dysmenorrhea and dyspareunia are frequent symptoms which often compromise all aspects of the women's quality of life (QoL). The pathophysiology of endometriosis-related pain is extremely complex and not always clear. The aim of this literature review is to focus on recent updates on the clinical presentation, the pathophysiology and the most important mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of pelvic pain in endometriosis. A literature search in the Cochrane library, PubMed, Scopus and web of Science databases has been performed, identifying articles from January 1995 to November 2020. Several processes seem to be involved in the pathogenesis of pain, but many aspects are still unclear. Scientific evidence has shown that a correlation between pain severity and stage of endometriosis rarely occurs, whereas there is a significant correlation between pain and the presence of deep endometriosis. Onset and intensity of pain may be due to a complex process involving central sensitization and peripheral activation of nociceptive pathways as well as dysfunction of the immune system and of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. A deeper understanding of these different pathogenetic mechanisms may improve future treatments in women with painful endometriosis.

A deep insight into pelvic pain and endometriosis: a review of the literature from pathophysiology to clinical expressions / Masciullo, Luisa; Viscardi, Maria F; Piacenti, Ilaria; Scaramuzzino, Sara; Cavalli, Alessandra; Piccioni, Maria G; Porpora, Maria G. - In: MINERVA OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY. - ISSN 2724-6450. - 73:5(2021), pp. 511-522.. [10.23736/S2724-606X.21.04779-1]

A deep insight into pelvic pain and endometriosis: a review of the literature from pathophysiology to clinical expressions

Masciullo, Luisa;Viscardi, Maria F;Piacenti, Ilaria;Scaramuzzino, Sara;Cavalli, Alessandra;Piccioni, Maria G;Porpora, Maria G
2021

Abstract

Endometriosis is a chronic inflammatory disease that affects approximately 10% of women of reproductive age. Its clinical manifestations are highly heterogeneous, but pelvic pain is the most frequent, causing functional disability. Cyclic or acyclic chronic pelvic pain (CPP), dysmenorrhea and dyspareunia are frequent symptoms which often compromise all aspects of the women's quality of life (QoL). The pathophysiology of endometriosis-related pain is extremely complex and not always clear. The aim of this literature review is to focus on recent updates on the clinical presentation, the pathophysiology and the most important mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of pelvic pain in endometriosis. A literature search in the Cochrane library, PubMed, Scopus and web of Science databases has been performed, identifying articles from January 1995 to November 2020. Several processes seem to be involved in the pathogenesis of pain, but many aspects are still unclear. Scientific evidence has shown that a correlation between pain severity and stage of endometriosis rarely occurs, whereas there is a significant correlation between pain and the presence of deep endometriosis. Onset and intensity of pain may be due to a complex process involving central sensitization and peripheral activation of nociceptive pathways as well as dysfunction of the immune system and of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. A deeper understanding of these different pathogenetic mechanisms may improve future treatments in women with painful endometriosis.
File allegati a questo prodotto
File Dimensione Formato  
Masciullo_Pelvic-pain_2021.pdf

solo gestori archivio

Tipologia: Versione editoriale (versione pubblicata con il layout dell'editore)
Licenza: Tutti i diritti riservati (All rights reserved)
Dimensione 404.04 kB
Formato Adobe PDF
404.04 kB Adobe PDF   Visualizza/Apri   Richiedi una copia

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11573/1543652
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? 3
  • Scopus 5
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 4
social impact