Respiratory and gastrointestinal symptoms are the predominant clinical manifestations of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Infecting intestinal epithelial cells, the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 may impact on host's microbiota and gut inflammation. It is well established that an imbalanced intestinal microbiome can affect pulmonary function, modulating the host immune response ("gut-lung axis"). While effective vaccines and targeted drugs are being tested, alternative pathophysiology-based options to prevent and treat COVID-19 infection must be considered on top of the limited evidence-based therapy currently available. Addressing intestinal dysbiosis with a probiotic supplement may, therefore, be a sensible option to be evaluated, in addition to current best available medical treatments. Herein, we summed up pathophysiologic assumptions and current evidence regarding bacteriotherapy administration in preventing and treating COVID-19 pneumonia.

Targeting microbiome: an alternative strategy for fighting SARS-CoV-2 infection / Spagnolello, Ornella; Pinacchio, Claudia; Santinelli, Letizia; Vassalini, Paolo; Innocenti, Giuseppe Pietro; De Girolamo, Gabriella; Fabris, Silvia; Giovanetti, Marta; Angeletti, Silvia; Russo, Alessandro; Mastroianni, Claudio M; Ciccozzi, Massimo; Ceccarelli, Giancarlo; d'Ettorre, Gabriella. - In: CHEMOTHERAPY. - ISSN 1421-9794. - 66:1-2(2021). [10.1159/000515344]

Targeting microbiome: an alternative strategy for fighting SARS-CoV-2 infection

Spagnolello, Ornella;Pinacchio, Claudia;Santinelli, Letizia;Vassalini, Paolo;Innocenti, Giuseppe Pietro;De Girolamo, Gabriella;Fabris, Silvia;Angeletti, Silvia;Mastroianni, Claudio M;Ceccarelli, Giancarlo
;
d'Ettorre, Gabriella
2021

Abstract

Respiratory and gastrointestinal symptoms are the predominant clinical manifestations of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Infecting intestinal epithelial cells, the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 may impact on host's microbiota and gut inflammation. It is well established that an imbalanced intestinal microbiome can affect pulmonary function, modulating the host immune response ("gut-lung axis"). While effective vaccines and targeted drugs are being tested, alternative pathophysiology-based options to prevent and treat COVID-19 infection must be considered on top of the limited evidence-based therapy currently available. Addressing intestinal dysbiosis with a probiotic supplement may, therefore, be a sensible option to be evaluated, in addition to current best available medical treatments. Herein, we summed up pathophysiologic assumptions and current evidence regarding bacteriotherapy administration in preventing and treating COVID-19 pneumonia.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11573/1526283
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