Abstract Background In response to the coronavirus disease of 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, healthcare systems worldwide have stepped up their infection prevention and control efforts in order to reduce the spread of the infection. Behaviours, such as hand hygiene, screening and cohorting of patients, and the appropriate use of antibiotics have long been recommended in surgery, but their implementation has often been patchy. Methods The current crisis presents an opportunity to learn about how to improve infection prevention and control and surveillance (IPCS) behaviours. The improvements made were mainly informal, quick and stemming from the frontline rather than originating from formal organizational structures. The adaptations made and the expertise acquired have the potential for triggering deeper learning and to create enduring improvements in the routine identification and management of infections relating to surgery. Results This paper aims to illustrate how adopting a human factors and ergonomics perspective can provide insights into how clinical work systems have been adapted and reconfigured in order to keep patients and staff safe. Conclusion For achieving sustainable change in IPCS practices in surgery during COVID-19 and beyond we need to enhance organizational learning potentials.

Will the COVID-19 pandemic transform infection prevention and control in surgery? Seeking leverage points for organizational learning / Toccafondi, G; Di Marzo, F; Sartelli, M; Sujan, M; Smyth, M; Bowie, P; Cardi, M; Cardi, M.. - In: INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL FOR QUALITY IN HEALTH CARE. - ISSN 1353-4505. - 33:Suppl 1(2021), pp. 51-55. [10.1093/intqhc/mzaa137]

Will the COVID-19 pandemic transform infection prevention and control in surgery? Seeking leverage points for organizational learning

Cardi M.
2021

Abstract

Abstract Background In response to the coronavirus disease of 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, healthcare systems worldwide have stepped up their infection prevention and control efforts in order to reduce the spread of the infection. Behaviours, such as hand hygiene, screening and cohorting of patients, and the appropriate use of antibiotics have long been recommended in surgery, but their implementation has often been patchy. Methods The current crisis presents an opportunity to learn about how to improve infection prevention and control and surveillance (IPCS) behaviours. The improvements made were mainly informal, quick and stemming from the frontline rather than originating from formal organizational structures. The adaptations made and the expertise acquired have the potential for triggering deeper learning and to create enduring improvements in the routine identification and management of infections relating to surgery. Results This paper aims to illustrate how adopting a human factors and ergonomics perspective can provide insights into how clinical work systems have been adapted and reconfigured in order to keep patients and staff safe. Conclusion For achieving sustainable change in IPCS practices in surgery during COVID-19 and beyond we need to enhance organizational learning potentials.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11573/1525803
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