Background: Thalamic pathology is a marker for neurodegeneration and multiple sclerosis (MS) disease progression. Objective: To characterize (1) the morphology of thalamic lesions, (2) their relation to cortical and white matter (WM) lesions, and (3) clinical measures, and to assess (4) the imaging correlates of thalamic atrophy. Methods: A total of 90 MS patients and 44 healthy controls underwent acquisition of 7 Tesla images for lesion segmentation and 3 Tesla scans for atrophy evaluation. Thalamic lesions were classified according to the shape and the presence of a central venule. Regression analysis identified the predictors of (1) thalamic atrophy, (2) neurological disability, and (3) information processing speed. Results: Thalamic lesions were mostly ovoid than periventricular, and for the great majority (78%) displayed a central venule. Lesion volume in the thalamus, cortex, and WM did not correlate with each other. Thalamic atrophy was only associated with WM lesion volume (p = 0.002); subpial and WM lesion volumes were associated with neurological disability (p = 0.016; p < 0.001); and WM and thalamic lesion volumes were related with cognitive impairment (p < 0.001; p = 0.03). Conclusion: Thalamic lesions are unrelated to those in the cortex and WM, suggesting that they may not share common pathogenic mechanisms and do not contribute to thalamic atrophy. Combined WM, subpial, and thalamic lesion volumes at 7 Tesla contribute to the disease severity.

Characterization of thalamic lesions and their correlates in multiple sclerosis by ultra-high-field MRI / Mehndiratta, A; Treaba, Ca; Barletta, V; Herranz, E; Ouellette, R; Jacob, A Sloane JA; Klawiter, Ec; Kinkel, Rp; Mainero, C.. - In: MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS. - ISSN 1352-4585. - (2020).

Characterization of thalamic lesions and their correlates in multiple sclerosis by ultra-high-field MRI.

Barletta V;Mainero C.
2020

Abstract

Background: Thalamic pathology is a marker for neurodegeneration and multiple sclerosis (MS) disease progression. Objective: To characterize (1) the morphology of thalamic lesions, (2) their relation to cortical and white matter (WM) lesions, and (3) clinical measures, and to assess (4) the imaging correlates of thalamic atrophy. Methods: A total of 90 MS patients and 44 healthy controls underwent acquisition of 7 Tesla images for lesion segmentation and 3 Tesla scans for atrophy evaluation. Thalamic lesions were classified according to the shape and the presence of a central venule. Regression analysis identified the predictors of (1) thalamic atrophy, (2) neurological disability, and (3) information processing speed. Results: Thalamic lesions were mostly ovoid than periventricular, and for the great majority (78%) displayed a central venule. Lesion volume in the thalamus, cortex, and WM did not correlate with each other. Thalamic atrophy was only associated with WM lesion volume (p = 0.002); subpial and WM lesion volumes were associated with neurological disability (p = 0.016; p < 0.001); and WM and thalamic lesion volumes were related with cognitive impairment (p < 0.001; p = 0.03). Conclusion: Thalamic lesions are unrelated to those in the cortex and WM, suggesting that they may not share common pathogenic mechanisms and do not contribute to thalamic atrophy. Combined WM, subpial, and thalamic lesion volumes at 7 Tesla contribute to the disease severity.
2020
Multiple sclerosis; atrophy; central venule; ovoid; periventricular; thalamus
01 Pubblicazione su rivista::01a Articolo in rivista
Characterization of thalamic lesions and their correlates in multiple sclerosis by ultra-high-field MRI / Mehndiratta, A; Treaba, Ca; Barletta, V; Herranz, E; Ouellette, R; Jacob, A Sloane JA; Klawiter, Ec; Kinkel, Rp; Mainero, C.. - In: MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS. - ISSN 1352-4585. - (2020).
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11573/1489937
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