Grounded in the framework of the gay glass ceiling, the current research investigated the effect of gay men’s internalized sexual stigma (ISS) on both the perceived effectiveness of other gay men’s leadership and on their self‐perceived leadership effectiveness and their intention to apply to a leadership position. In three studies (N = 402), we manipulated either the leader’s sexual orientation (SO) (study 1), or his adherence to traditional gender roles (TGR) (study 2), or participants’ fictitious masculinity score (study 3). Our hypotheses were as follows: the leader’s SO and TGR would moderate the association of gay participants’ ISS with their positive attitudes towards the leader and with his leadership effectiveness; and gay participants’ masculinity threat would moderate the association of their ISS with their intention to apply to a leadership position, and with their self‐perceived effectiveness as potential leaders. Moderated regression analyses showed that: participants reported a more positive attitude towards a gay man (vs. heterosexual) as leader only when they had low – and not high – ISS; participants with high (vs. low) ISS perceived the masculine gay leader as more effective than the feminine gay leader; under masculinity threat, participants with high (vs. low) ISS showed less intention to apply to a leadership position. These studies provide both confirmation and novel insights into the key role of internalized sexual stigma and traditional gender roles. Indeed, these factors can strengthen and perpetuate the gay glass ceiling effect.

Embrace the leadership challenge: the role of gay men’s internalized sexual stigma on the evaluation of others’ leadership and one’s own / Salvati, Marco; Pellegrini, Valerio; Giacomantonio, Mauro; De Cristofaro, Valeria. - In: BRITISH JOURNAL OF SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY. - ISSN 0144-6665. - (2020). [10.1111/bjso.12424]

Embrace the leadership challenge: the role of gay men’s internalized sexual stigma on the evaluation of others’ leadership and one’s own

Marco Salvati
Primo
;
Valerio Pellegrini
Secondo
;
Mauro Giacomantonio
Penultimo
;
Valeria De Cristofaro
Ultimo
2020

Abstract

Grounded in the framework of the gay glass ceiling, the current research investigated the effect of gay men’s internalized sexual stigma (ISS) on both the perceived effectiveness of other gay men’s leadership and on their self‐perceived leadership effectiveness and their intention to apply to a leadership position. In three studies (N = 402), we manipulated either the leader’s sexual orientation (SO) (study 1), or his adherence to traditional gender roles (TGR) (study 2), or participants’ fictitious masculinity score (study 3). Our hypotheses were as follows: the leader’s SO and TGR would moderate the association of gay participants’ ISS with their positive attitudes towards the leader and with his leadership effectiveness; and gay participants’ masculinity threat would moderate the association of their ISS with their intention to apply to a leadership position, and with their self‐perceived effectiveness as potential leaders. Moderated regression analyses showed that: participants reported a more positive attitude towards a gay man (vs. heterosexual) as leader only when they had low – and not high – ISS; participants with high (vs. low) ISS perceived the masculine gay leader as more effective than the feminine gay leader; under masculinity threat, participants with high (vs. low) ISS showed less intention to apply to a leadership position. These studies provide both confirmation and novel insights into the key role of internalized sexual stigma and traditional gender roles. Indeed, these factors can strengthen and perpetuate the gay glass ceiling effect.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11573/1475275
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