Background: There is paucity of data on the potential value of early palliative home care for patients with hematologic malignancies.Objective: To compare costs, use of resources, and clinical outcomes between an early palliative home care program and standard hospital care for active-advanced or terminal phase patients.Patients and Methods: In this real-life, nonrandomized comparative study, the allocation of advanced/terminal phase patients to either home or hospital was based on pragmatic considerations. Analysis focused on resources use, events requiring blood unit transfusions or parenteral therapy, patient-reported symptom burden, mean weekly cost of care (MWC), cost-minimization difference, and incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER).Results: Of 119 patients, 59 patients cared at home were more debilitated and had a shorter survival than the 60 in hospital group (p = 0.001). Nevertheless, symptom burden was similar in both groups. At home the mean weekly number of transfusions (1.45) was lower than that at hospital (2.77). Higher rate of infections occurred at hospital (54%) versus home (21%; <0.001). MWC for hospitalization was significantly higher in a 3:1 ratio versus home care. Compared with hospital, domiciliary assistance produced a weekly saving of euro 2314.9 for the health provider, with a charge of euro 85.9 for the family, and was cost-effective by an ICER of euro -7013.9 of prevented days of care for avoided infections.Conclusions: Current findings suggest that costs of early palliative home care for patients with hematologic malignancies are lower than standard hospital care costs. Domiciliary assistance may also be cost-effective by reducing the number of days to treat infections.

Early Palliative Home Care versus Hospital Care for Patients with Hematologic Malignancies: A Cost-Effectiveness Study / Cartoni, Claudio; Breccia, Massimo; Giesinger, Johannes Maria; Baldacci, Erminia; Carmosino, Ida; Annechini, Giorgia; Palumbo, Giovanna; Armiento, Daniele; Niscola, Pasquale; Tendas, Andrea; Brunetti, Gregorio Antonio; Minotti, Clara; Marini, Maria Giulia; Reale, Luigi; Martone, Nicoletta; Martelli, Maurizio; Efficace, Fabio. - In: JOURNAL OF PALLIATIVE MEDICINE. - ISSN 1096-6218. - (2020). [10.1089/jpm.2020.0396]

Early Palliative Home Care versus Hospital Care for Patients with Hematologic Malignancies: A Cost-Effectiveness Study

Baldacci, Erminia;Carmosino, Ida;Annechini, Giorgia;Palumbo, Giovanna;Martelli, Maurizio;Efficace, Fabio
2020

Abstract

Background: There is paucity of data on the potential value of early palliative home care for patients with hematologic malignancies.Objective: To compare costs, use of resources, and clinical outcomes between an early palliative home care program and standard hospital care for active-advanced or terminal phase patients.Patients and Methods: In this real-life, nonrandomized comparative study, the allocation of advanced/terminal phase patients to either home or hospital was based on pragmatic considerations. Analysis focused on resources use, events requiring blood unit transfusions or parenteral therapy, patient-reported symptom burden, mean weekly cost of care (MWC), cost-minimization difference, and incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER).Results: Of 119 patients, 59 patients cared at home were more debilitated and had a shorter survival than the 60 in hospital group (p = 0.001). Nevertheless, symptom burden was similar in both groups. At home the mean weekly number of transfusions (1.45) was lower than that at hospital (2.77). Higher rate of infections occurred at hospital (54%) versus home (21%; <0.001). MWC for hospitalization was significantly higher in a 3:1 ratio versus home care. Compared with hospital, domiciliary assistance produced a weekly saving of euro 2314.9 for the health provider, with a charge of euro 85.9 for the family, and was cost-effective by an ICER of euro -7013.9 of prevented days of care for avoided infections.Conclusions: Current findings suggest that costs of early palliative home care for patients with hematologic malignancies are lower than standard hospital care costs. Domiciliary assistance may also be cost-effective by reducing the number of days to treat infections.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11573/1468525
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