Aims: The aim of our study was to evaluate the relationship between smoking, metabolic syndrome (MetS) and persistence of nocturia in patients with moderate/severe nocturia (nocturia episodes ≥2), lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTSs), and benign prostatic enlargement (BPE) undergoing transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP). Methods: From 2015 onward, a consecutive series of patients with moderate/severe nocturia (nocturia episodes ≥2), LUTS, and BPE undergoing TURP were prospectively enrolled. Medical history, physical examination, and smoking status were recorded. MetS was defined according to Adult Treatment Panel III. Moderate/severe persistent nocturia after TURP was defined as nocturia episodes ≥2. Binary logistic regression analysis was used to evaluate the risk of persisting nocturia. Results: One hundred two patients were enrolled with a median age of 70 years (interquartile range: 65/73). After TURP, moderate/severe nocturia was reported in 43 of 102 (42%) of the patients. Overall 40 of 102 (39%) patients presented a MetS, and out of them, 23 of 40 (58%) presented a moderate/severe persistent nocturia after TURP (P =.001). Overall 62 of 102 (61%) patients were smokers, and out of them, 32 of 62 (52%) presented moderate/severe persistent nocturia after TURP (P =.034). On multivariate analysis, prostate volume, MetS, and smoking were independent risk factors for moderate/severe persistent nocturia after TURP. Conclusion: In our single-center study, MetS and smoking increased the risk of moderate/severe persistent nocturia after TURP in patients with LUTS-BPE. Although these results should be confirmed, and the pathophysiology is yet to be completely understood, counseling smokers and MetS patients about the risk of postoperative persistent nocturia is warranted.

Metabolic syndrome and smoking are associated with persistence of nocturia after transurethral resection of the prostate / De Nunzio, C.; Tema, G.; Lombardo, R.; Cicione, A.; Nacchia, A.; D'Annunzio, S.; Sarchi, L.; Proietti, F.; Brassetti, A.; Tubaro, A.. - In: NEUROUROLOGY AND URODYNAMICS. - ISSN 0733-2467. - 38:6(2019), pp. 1692-1699. [10.1002/nau.24041]

Metabolic syndrome and smoking are associated with persistence of nocturia after transurethral resection of the prostate

De Nunzio C.
;
Tema G.;Lombardo R.;Cicione A.;Nacchia A.;D'Annunzio S.;Sarchi L.;Proietti F.;Brassetti A.;Tubaro A.
2019

Abstract

Aims: The aim of our study was to evaluate the relationship between smoking, metabolic syndrome (MetS) and persistence of nocturia in patients with moderate/severe nocturia (nocturia episodes ≥2), lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTSs), and benign prostatic enlargement (BPE) undergoing transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP). Methods: From 2015 onward, a consecutive series of patients with moderate/severe nocturia (nocturia episodes ≥2), LUTS, and BPE undergoing TURP were prospectively enrolled. Medical history, physical examination, and smoking status were recorded. MetS was defined according to Adult Treatment Panel III. Moderate/severe persistent nocturia after TURP was defined as nocturia episodes ≥2. Binary logistic regression analysis was used to evaluate the risk of persisting nocturia. Results: One hundred two patients were enrolled with a median age of 70 years (interquartile range: 65/73). After TURP, moderate/severe nocturia was reported in 43 of 102 (42%) of the patients. Overall 40 of 102 (39%) patients presented a MetS, and out of them, 23 of 40 (58%) presented a moderate/severe persistent nocturia after TURP (P =.001). Overall 62 of 102 (61%) patients were smokers, and out of them, 32 of 62 (52%) presented moderate/severe persistent nocturia after TURP (P =.034). On multivariate analysis, prostate volume, MetS, and smoking were independent risk factors for moderate/severe persistent nocturia after TURP. Conclusion: In our single-center study, MetS and smoking increased the risk of moderate/severe persistent nocturia after TURP in patients with LUTS-BPE. Although these results should be confirmed, and the pathophysiology is yet to be completely understood, counseling smokers and MetS patients about the risk of postoperative persistent nocturia is warranted.
2019
metabolic syndrome; nocturia; smoking
01 Pubblicazione su rivista::01a Articolo in rivista
Metabolic syndrome and smoking are associated with persistence of nocturia after transurethral resection of the prostate / De Nunzio, C.; Tema, G.; Lombardo, R.; Cicione, A.; Nacchia, A.; D'Annunzio, S.; Sarchi, L.; Proietti, F.; Brassetti, A.; Tubaro, A.. - In: NEUROUROLOGY AND URODYNAMICS. - ISSN 0733-2467. - 38:6(2019), pp. 1692-1699. [10.1002/nau.24041]
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11573/1456610
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