The IUCN (International Union for Conservation of Nature) Red List categories and criteria are the most widely used framework for assessing the relative extinction risk of species. The criteria are based on quantitative thresholds relating to the size, trends, and structure of species’ distributions and populations. However, data on these parameters are sparse and uncertain for many species and unavailable for others, potentially leading to their misclassification or classification as data deficient. We devised an approach that combines data on land-cover change, species-specific habitat preferences, population abundance, and dispersal distance to estimate key parameters (extent of occurrence, maximum area of occupancy, population size and trend, and degree of fragmentation) and hence predict IUCN Red List categories for species. We applied our approach to nonpelagic birds and terrestrial mammals globally (∼15,000 species). The predicted categories were fairly consistent with published IUCN Red List assessments, but more optimistic overall. We predicted 4.2% of species (467 birds and 143 mammals) to be more threatened than currently assessed and 20.2% of data deficient species (10 birds and 114 mammals) to be at risk of extinction. Incorporating the habitat fragmentation subcriterion reduced these predictions 1.5–2.3% and 6.4–14.9% (depending on the quantitative definition of fragmentation) for threatened and data deficient species, respectively, highlighting the need for improved guidance for IUCN Red List assessors on the application of this aspect of the IUCN Red List criteria. Our approach complements traditional methods of estimating parameters for IUCN Red List assessments. Furthermore, it readily provides an early-warning system to identify species potentially warranting changes in their extinction-risk category based on periodic updates of land-cover information. Given our method relies on optimistic assumptions about species distribution and abundance, all species predicted to be more at risk than currently evaluated should be prioritized for reassessment.

Applying habitat and population-density models to land-cover time series to inform IUCN Red List assessments / Santini, L.; Butchart, S. H. M.; Rondinini, C.; Benitez-Lopez, A.; Hilbers, J. P.; Schipper, A. M.; Cengic, M.; Tobias, J. A.; Huijbregts, M. A. J.. - In: CONSERVATION BIOLOGY. - ISSN 0888-8892. - 33:5(2019), pp. 1084-1093. [10.1111/cobi.13279]

Applying habitat and population-density models to land-cover time series to inform IUCN Red List assessments

Santini L.;Rondinini C.;
2019

Abstract

The IUCN (International Union for Conservation of Nature) Red List categories and criteria are the most widely used framework for assessing the relative extinction risk of species. The criteria are based on quantitative thresholds relating to the size, trends, and structure of species’ distributions and populations. However, data on these parameters are sparse and uncertain for many species and unavailable for others, potentially leading to their misclassification or classification as data deficient. We devised an approach that combines data on land-cover change, species-specific habitat preferences, population abundance, and dispersal distance to estimate key parameters (extent of occurrence, maximum area of occupancy, population size and trend, and degree of fragmentation) and hence predict IUCN Red List categories for species. We applied our approach to nonpelagic birds and terrestrial mammals globally (∼15,000 species). The predicted categories were fairly consistent with published IUCN Red List assessments, but more optimistic overall. We predicted 4.2% of species (467 birds and 143 mammals) to be more threatened than currently assessed and 20.2% of data deficient species (10 birds and 114 mammals) to be at risk of extinction. Incorporating the habitat fragmentation subcriterion reduced these predictions 1.5–2.3% and 6.4–14.9% (depending on the quantitative definition of fragmentation) for threatened and data deficient species, respectively, highlighting the need for improved guidance for IUCN Red List assessors on the application of this aspect of the IUCN Red List criteria. Our approach complements traditional methods of estimating parameters for IUCN Red List assessments. Furthermore, it readily provides an early-warning system to identify species potentially warranting changes in their extinction-risk category based on periodic updates of land-cover information. Given our method relies on optimistic assumptions about species distribution and abundance, all species predicted to be more at risk than currently evaluated should be prioritized for reassessment.
2019
aves; birds; conservación; conservation; data deficient species; especies con deficiencia de datos; extinction risk; mammals; mamíferos; remote sensing; riesgo de extinción; teledetección
01 Pubblicazione su rivista::01a Articolo in rivista
Applying habitat and population-density models to land-cover time series to inform IUCN Red List assessments / Santini, L.; Butchart, S. H. M.; Rondinini, C.; Benitez-Lopez, A.; Hilbers, J. P.; Schipper, A. M.; Cengic, M.; Tobias, J. A.; Huijbregts, M. A. J.. - In: CONSERVATION BIOLOGY. - ISSN 0888-8892. - 33:5(2019), pp. 1084-1093. [10.1111/cobi.13279]
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11573/1444726
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