The outcome of an action plays a crucial role in decision-making and reinforcement learning processes. Indeed, both human and animal behavioural studies have shown that different expected reward values, either quantitatively or qualitatively, modulate the motivation of subjects to perform an action and, as a consequence, affect their behavioural performance. Here, we investigated the effect of different amounts of reward on the learning of macaque monkeys using a modified version of the object-in-place task. This task offers the opportunity to shape rapid learning based on a set of external stimuli that enhance an animal's accuracy in terms of solving a problem. We compared the learning of three monkeys among three different reward conditions. Our results demonstrate that the larger the reward, the better the monkey's ability to learn the associations starting with the second presentation of the problem. Moreover, we compared the present results with those of our previous work using the same monkeys in the same task but with a unique reward condition, the intermediate one. Interestingly, the performance of our animals in our previous work matched with their performance in the largest and not intermediate reward condition of the present study These results suggest that learning is mostly influenced by the reward context and not by its absolute value.

Effects of reward size and context on learning in macaque monkeys / Ferrucci, L.; Nougaret, S.; Brunamonti, E.; Genovesio, A.. - In: BEHAVIOURAL BRAIN RESEARCH. - ISSN 0166-4328. - 372:(2019). [10.1016/j.bbr.2019.111983]

Effects of reward size and context on learning in macaque monkeys

Ferrucci L.
Primo
Membro del Collaboration Group
;
Nougaret S.
Secondo
Membro del Collaboration Group
;
Brunamonti E.
Penultimo
Membro del Collaboration Group
;
Genovesio A.
Ultimo
Conceptualization
2019

Abstract

The outcome of an action plays a crucial role in decision-making and reinforcement learning processes. Indeed, both human and animal behavioural studies have shown that different expected reward values, either quantitatively or qualitatively, modulate the motivation of subjects to perform an action and, as a consequence, affect their behavioural performance. Here, we investigated the effect of different amounts of reward on the learning of macaque monkeys using a modified version of the object-in-place task. This task offers the opportunity to shape rapid learning based on a set of external stimuli that enhance an animal's accuracy in terms of solving a problem. We compared the learning of three monkeys among three different reward conditions. Our results demonstrate that the larger the reward, the better the monkey's ability to learn the associations starting with the second presentation of the problem. Moreover, we compared the present results with those of our previous work using the same monkeys in the same task but with a unique reward condition, the intermediate one. Interestingly, the performance of our animals in our previous work matched with their performance in the largest and not intermediate reward condition of the present study These results suggest that learning is mostly influenced by the reward context and not by its absolute value.
context; learning; monkeys; reward
01 Pubblicazione su rivista::01a Articolo in rivista
Effects of reward size and context on learning in macaque monkeys / Ferrucci, L.; Nougaret, S.; Brunamonti, E.; Genovesio, A.. - In: BEHAVIOURAL BRAIN RESEARCH. - ISSN 0166-4328. - 372:(2019). [10.1016/j.bbr.2019.111983]
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11573/1414568
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