Objective: This article reviews: (1) the evidence related to enhanced central gain as a potential mechanism for the generation of tinnitus and hyperacusis, (2) the neuroplastic changes induced by prolonged, low-level sound stimulation and (3) the clinical effectiveness of various sound therapies and amplification for the treatment of tinnitus and hyperacusis. Design: General literature review. Study sample: Peer-reviewed articles related to auditory neural gain, prolonged low-level noise exposure and effectiveness of sound therapy. Results: A large body of literature exists supporting the enhanced neural gain model of tinnitus and hyperacusis. Neuroplastic changes associated with prolonged low-level noise show evidence of reversing enhanced neural gain, which should theoretically reduce percepts of tinnitus and/or hyperacusis. However, the available clinical evidence assessing the efficacy of sound therapy to reduce tinnitus or hyperacusis lacks controlled clinical trials to accurately assess the effectiveness of sound therapy. Conclusions: The available literature from basic science studies supports the neural gain model of tinnitus and hyperacusis, which conceivably should be effectively managed with sound therapy. However, well-controlled clinical trials are needed before conclusions can be made on the effectiveness of sound therapy for tinnitus and hyperacusis.

A review of auditory gain, low-level noise and sound therapy for tinnitus and hyperacusis / Sheppard, A.; Stocking, C.; Ralli, M.; Salvi, R.. - In: INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF AUDIOLOGY. - ISSN 1499-2027. - 59:1(2020), pp. 5-15. [10.1080/14992027.2019.1660812]

A review of auditory gain, low-level noise and sound therapy for tinnitus and hyperacusis

Sheppard A.
;
Ralli M.
Penultimo
;
Salvi R.
Ultimo
2020

Abstract

Objective: This article reviews: (1) the evidence related to enhanced central gain as a potential mechanism for the generation of tinnitus and hyperacusis, (2) the neuroplastic changes induced by prolonged, low-level sound stimulation and (3) the clinical effectiveness of various sound therapies and amplification for the treatment of tinnitus and hyperacusis. Design: General literature review. Study sample: Peer-reviewed articles related to auditory neural gain, prolonged low-level noise exposure and effectiveness of sound therapy. Results: A large body of literature exists supporting the enhanced neural gain model of tinnitus and hyperacusis. Neuroplastic changes associated with prolonged low-level noise show evidence of reversing enhanced neural gain, which should theoretically reduce percepts of tinnitus and/or hyperacusis. However, the available clinical evidence assessing the efficacy of sound therapy to reduce tinnitus or hyperacusis lacks controlled clinical trials to accurately assess the effectiveness of sound therapy. Conclusions: The available literature from basic science studies supports the neural gain model of tinnitus and hyperacusis, which conceivably should be effectively managed with sound therapy. However, well-controlled clinical trials are needed before conclusions can be made on the effectiveness of sound therapy for tinnitus and hyperacusis.
2020
auditory gain; hyperacusis; low-level noise; sound therapy; tinnitus
01 Pubblicazione su rivista::01g Articolo di rassegna (Review)
A review of auditory gain, low-level noise and sound therapy for tinnitus and hyperacusis / Sheppard, A.; Stocking, C.; Ralli, M.; Salvi, R.. - In: INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF AUDIOLOGY. - ISSN 1499-2027. - 59:1(2020), pp. 5-15. [10.1080/14992027.2019.1660812]
File allegati a questo prodotto
File Dimensione Formato  
Sheppard_A review of_2020.pdf

solo gestori archivio

Tipologia: Versione editoriale (versione pubblicata con il layout dell'editore)
Licenza: Tutti i diritti riservati (All rights reserved)
Dimensione 1.55 MB
Formato Adobe PDF
1.55 MB Adobe PDF   Contatta l'autore

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11573/1412787
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? 13
  • Scopus 28
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 23
social impact