Transitional waters are highly productive ecosystems, providing essential goods and services to the biosphere and human population. Human influence in coastal areas exposes these ecosystems to continuous internal and external disturbance. Nitrogen-loads can affect the composition of the resident community and the trophic relationships between and within species, including fish. Based on carbon (δ13C) and nitrogen (δ15N) stable isotope analyses of individuals, we explored the feeding behaviour of two ecologically and economically important omnivorous fish, the eel Anguilla anguilla and the seabream Diplodus annularis, in three neighbouring lakes characterised by different trophic conditions. We found that A. anguilla showed greater generalism in the eutrophic lake due to the increased contribution of basal resources and invertebrates to its diet. By contrast, the diet of D. annularis, which was mainly based on invertebrate species, became more specialised, focusing especially on polychaetes. Our results suggest that changes in macroinvertebrate and fish community composition, coupled with anthropogenic pressure, affect the trophic strategies of high trophic level consumers such as A. anguilla and D. annularis. Detailed food web descriptions based on the feeding choices of isotopic trophospecies (here Isotopic Trophic Units, ITUs) enable identification of the prey taxa crucial for the persistence of omnivorous fish stocks, thus providing useful information for their management and habitat conservation.

Changing isotopic food webs of two economically important fish in mediterranean coastal lakes with different trophic status / Sporta Caputi, Simona; Careddu, Giulio; Calizza, Edoardo; Fiorentino, Federico; Maccapan, Deborah; Rossi, Loreto; Costantini, Maria Letizia. - In: APPLIED SCIENCES. - ISSN 2076-3417. - 10:8(2020). [10.3390/app10082756]

Changing isotopic food webs of two economically important fish in mediterranean coastal lakes with different trophic status

Sporta Caputi, Simona;Careddu, Giulio;Calizza, Edoardo
;
Fiorentino, Federico;Maccapan, Deborah;Rossi, Loreto;Costantini, Maria Letizia
2020

Abstract

Transitional waters are highly productive ecosystems, providing essential goods and services to the biosphere and human population. Human influence in coastal areas exposes these ecosystems to continuous internal and external disturbance. Nitrogen-loads can affect the composition of the resident community and the trophic relationships between and within species, including fish. Based on carbon (δ13C) and nitrogen (δ15N) stable isotope analyses of individuals, we explored the feeding behaviour of two ecologically and economically important omnivorous fish, the eel Anguilla anguilla and the seabream Diplodus annularis, in three neighbouring lakes characterised by different trophic conditions. We found that A. anguilla showed greater generalism in the eutrophic lake due to the increased contribution of basal resources and invertebrates to its diet. By contrast, the diet of D. annularis, which was mainly based on invertebrate species, became more specialised, focusing especially on polychaetes. Our results suggest that changes in macroinvertebrate and fish community composition, coupled with anthropogenic pressure, affect the trophic strategies of high trophic level consumers such as A. anguilla and D. annularis. Detailed food web descriptions based on the feeding choices of isotopic trophospecies (here Isotopic Trophic Units, ITUs) enable identification of the prey taxa crucial for the persistence of omnivorous fish stocks, thus providing useful information for their management and habitat conservation.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11573/1409721
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