The number of car crashes has gradually reduced in the last decade across all European Countries, but the number of motorcycle crashes has remained nearly the same. In our research we investigate whether there are differences in attitudes towards road safety issues, driving behaviours in specific imagined situations, risk perception and risk concern, among young student drivers and riders. The study involved a large sample taken from across six European countries. The results reveal that although there are no differences between motorcyclists and car drivers in their attitudes toward road safety rules, differences do appear when the road rules compliance is assessed in specific imagined situations, with motorcyclists reporting to be more prone than car-drivers to violations of traffic rules. Moreover, despite the perceived risk during driving is the same for motorcyclists and car-drivers, differences do appear on their concern about this risk, with motorcyclists reporting to be less concerned than car-drivers about the risk of a road crash. This could lead to a high probability of risky driving behaviour in motorcyclists than in car-drivers. Present findings have important practical implications for road safety training courses.

Driving attitudes, behaviours, risk perception and risk concern among young student car-drivers, motorcyclists and pedestrians in various EU countries / Cordellieri, P.; Sdoia, S.; Ferlazzo, F.; Sgalla, R.; Giannini, A. M.. - In: TRANSPORTATION RESEARCH PART F: TRAFFIC PSYCHOLOGY AND BEHAVIOUR. - ISSN 1369-8478. - 65:(2019), pp. 56-67. [10.1016/j.trf.2019.07.012]

Driving attitudes, behaviours, risk perception and risk concern among young student car-drivers, motorcyclists and pedestrians in various EU countries

Cordellieri P.;Sdoia S.;Ferlazzo F.;Sgalla R.;Giannini A. M.
2019

Abstract

The number of car crashes has gradually reduced in the last decade across all European Countries, but the number of motorcycle crashes has remained nearly the same. In our research we investigate whether there are differences in attitudes towards road safety issues, driving behaviours in specific imagined situations, risk perception and risk concern, among young student drivers and riders. The study involved a large sample taken from across six European countries. The results reveal that although there are no differences between motorcyclists and car drivers in their attitudes toward road safety rules, differences do appear when the road rules compliance is assessed in specific imagined situations, with motorcyclists reporting to be more prone than car-drivers to violations of traffic rules. Moreover, despite the perceived risk during driving is the same for motorcyclists and car-drivers, differences do appear on their concern about this risk, with motorcyclists reporting to be less concerned than car-drivers about the risk of a road crash. This could lead to a high probability of risky driving behaviour in motorcyclists than in car-drivers. Present findings have important practical implications for road safety training courses.
2019
Driving attitudes; behaviour; risk perception; car crashes
01 Pubblicazione su rivista::01a Articolo in rivista
Driving attitudes, behaviours, risk perception and risk concern among young student car-drivers, motorcyclists and pedestrians in various EU countries / Cordellieri, P.; Sdoia, S.; Ferlazzo, F.; Sgalla, R.; Giannini, A. M.. - In: TRANSPORTATION RESEARCH PART F: TRAFFIC PSYCHOLOGY AND BEHAVIOUR. - ISSN 1369-8478. - 65:(2019), pp. 56-67. [10.1016/j.trf.2019.07.012]
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11573/1353255
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