Background and Aims An expanding number of monogenic defects have been identified as causative of severe forms of very early-onset inflammatory bowel diseases [VEO-IBD]. The present study aimed at defining how next-generation sequencing [NGS] methods can be used to improve identification of known molecular diagnosis and to adapt treatment. Methods A total of 207 children were recruited in 45 paediatric centres through an international collaborative network [ESPGHAN GENIUS working group] with a clinical presentation of severe VEO-IBD [n = 185] or an anamnesis suggestive of a monogenic disorder [n = 22]. Patients were divided at inclusion into three phenotypic subsets: Predominantly small bowel inflammation, colitis with perianal lesions, and colitis only. Methods to obtain molecular diagnosis included functional tests followed by specific Sanger sequencing, custom-made targeted NGS, and in selected cases whole exome sequencing [WES] of parents-child trios. Genetic findings were validated clinically and/or functionally. Results Molecular diagnosis was achieved in 66/207 children [32%]: 61% with small bowel inflammation, 39% with colitis and perianal lesions, and 18% with colitis only. Targeted NGS pinpointed gene mutations causative of atypical presentations, and identified large exonic copy number variations previously missed by WES. Conclusions Our results lead us to propose an optimised diagnostic strategy to identify known monogenic causes of severe IBD.

Diagnostic yield of next-generation sequencing in very early-onset inflammatory bowel diseases: A multicentre study / Charbit-Henrion, F.; Parlato, M.; Hanein, S.; Duclaux-Loras, R.; Nowak, J.; Begue, B.; Rakotobe, S.; Bruneau, J.; Fourrage, C.; Alibeu, O.; Rieux-Laucat, F.; Levy, E.; Stolzenberg, M. -C.; Mazerolles, F.; Latour, S.; Lenoir, C.; Fischer, A.; Picard, C.; Aloi, M.; Dias, J. A.; Hariz, M. B.; Bourrier, A.; Breuer, C.; Breton, A.; Bronski, J.; Buderus, S.; Cananzi, M.; Coopman, S.; Cremilleux, C.; Dabadie, A.; Dumant-Forest, C.; Gurkan, O. E.; Fabre, A.; Fischer, A.; Diaz, M. G.; Gonzalez-Lama, Y.; Goulet, O.; Guariso, G.; Gurcan, N.; Homan, M.; Hugot, J. -P.; Jeziorski, E.; Karanika, E.; Lachaux, A.; Lewindon, P.; Lima, R.; Magro, F.; Major, J.; Malamut, G.; Mas, E.; Mattyus, I.; Mearin, L. M.; Melek, J.; Navas-Lopez, V. M.; Paerregaard, A.; Pelatan, C.; Pigneur, B.; Pais, I. P.; Rebeuh, J.; Romano, C.; Siala, N.; Strisciuglio, C.; Tempia-Caliera, M.; Tounian, P.; Turner, D.; Urbonas, V.; Willot, S.; Ruemmele, F. M.; Cerf-Bensussan, N.. - In: JOURNAL OF CROHN'S AND COLITIS. - ISSN 1873-9946. - 12:9(2018), pp. 1104-1112. [10.1093/ecco-jcc/jjy068]

Diagnostic yield of next-generation sequencing in very early-onset inflammatory bowel diseases: A multicentre study

Aloi M.;Cananzi M.;Magro F.;Siala N.;
2018

Abstract

Background and Aims An expanding number of monogenic defects have been identified as causative of severe forms of very early-onset inflammatory bowel diseases [VEO-IBD]. The present study aimed at defining how next-generation sequencing [NGS] methods can be used to improve identification of known molecular diagnosis and to adapt treatment. Methods A total of 207 children were recruited in 45 paediatric centres through an international collaborative network [ESPGHAN GENIUS working group] with a clinical presentation of severe VEO-IBD [n = 185] or an anamnesis suggestive of a monogenic disorder [n = 22]. Patients were divided at inclusion into three phenotypic subsets: Predominantly small bowel inflammation, colitis with perianal lesions, and colitis only. Methods to obtain molecular diagnosis included functional tests followed by specific Sanger sequencing, custom-made targeted NGS, and in selected cases whole exome sequencing [WES] of parents-child trios. Genetic findings were validated clinically and/or functionally. Results Molecular diagnosis was achieved in 66/207 children [32%]: 61% with small bowel inflammation, 39% with colitis and perianal lesions, and 18% with colitis only. Targeted NGS pinpointed gene mutations causative of atypical presentations, and identified large exonic copy number variations previously missed by WES. Conclusions Our results lead us to propose an optimised diagnostic strategy to identify known monogenic causes of severe IBD.
Genetics and molecular epidemiology; monogenic disorders; paediatrics; TNGS; VEO-IBD
01 Pubblicazione su rivista::01a Articolo in rivista
Diagnostic yield of next-generation sequencing in very early-onset inflammatory bowel diseases: A multicentre study / Charbit-Henrion, F.; Parlato, M.; Hanein, S.; Duclaux-Loras, R.; Nowak, J.; Begue, B.; Rakotobe, S.; Bruneau, J.; Fourrage, C.; Alibeu, O.; Rieux-Laucat, F.; Levy, E.; Stolzenberg, M. -C.; Mazerolles, F.; Latour, S.; Lenoir, C.; Fischer, A.; Picard, C.; Aloi, M.; Dias, J. A.; Hariz, M. B.; Bourrier, A.; Breuer, C.; Breton, A.; Bronski, J.; Buderus, S.; Cananzi, M.; Coopman, S.; Cremilleux, C.; Dabadie, A.; Dumant-Forest, C.; Gurkan, O. E.; Fabre, A.; Fischer, A.; Diaz, M. G.; Gonzalez-Lama, Y.; Goulet, O.; Guariso, G.; Gurcan, N.; Homan, M.; Hugot, J. -P.; Jeziorski, E.; Karanika, E.; Lachaux, A.; Lewindon, P.; Lima, R.; Magro, F.; Major, J.; Malamut, G.; Mas, E.; Mattyus, I.; Mearin, L. M.; Melek, J.; Navas-Lopez, V. M.; Paerregaard, A.; Pelatan, C.; Pigneur, B.; Pais, I. P.; Rebeuh, J.; Romano, C.; Siala, N.; Strisciuglio, C.; Tempia-Caliera, M.; Tounian, P.; Turner, D.; Urbonas, V.; Willot, S.; Ruemmele, F. M.; Cerf-Bensussan, N.. - In: JOURNAL OF CROHN'S AND COLITIS. - ISSN 1873-9946. - 12:9(2018), pp. 1104-1112. [10.1093/ecco-jcc/jjy068]
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11573/1347937
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