Introduction: Recent insights show that gut-mucosal immunity and intestinal microbiota play a key role in the pathogenesis of HIV infection. Alterations in the composition of intestinal flora (dysbiosis) could be associated with an impaired intestinal epithelium barrier activity and an impaired mucosal immunity function, significantly contributing to microbial translocation which is considered a major driver of chronic immune activation. Areas covered: This article provides an overview on the novel trends in probiotic therapy application. A particular emphasis is addressed to the importance of probiotics as a novel strategy to attenuate or prevent gastrointestinal involvement and to improve gut-mucosal immunity in HIV-infected subjects. Therefore, opportunities, limits and methodological criticalities of supplementation with probiotic therapy are considered and analyzed. Expert opinion: Use of probiotics is emerging as a novel strategy to manage dysbiosis and gut-mucosal impairment, to reduce immune activation and to limit a number of non-AIDS-related disorders. However, despite the growing use of probiotic therapy, mechanisms by which oral bacteria intake exhibits its effects are strain-related and disease-specific, hence clinicians need to take these two factors into consideration when suggesting probiotic supplementation to HIV-infected patients.

Challenges in the management of HIV infection. Update on the role of probiotic supplementation as a possible complementary therapeutic strategy for cART treated people living with HIV/AIDS / Ceccarelli, G.; Statzu, M.; Santinelli, L.; Pinacchio, C.; Bitossi, C.; Cavallari, E. N.; Vullo, V.; Scagnolari, C.; d'Ettorre, G.. - In: EXPERT OPINION ON BIOLOGICAL THERAPY. - ISSN 1471-2598. - 19:9(2019), pp. 949-965. [10.1080/14712598.2019.1638907]

Challenges in the management of HIV infection. Update on the role of probiotic supplementation as a possible complementary therapeutic strategy for cART treated people living with HIV/AIDS

Ceccarelli G.;Statzu M.;Santinelli L.;Pinacchio C.;Bitossi C.;Cavallari E. N.;Vullo V.;Scagnolari C.;d'Ettorre G.
2019

Abstract

Introduction: Recent insights show that gut-mucosal immunity and intestinal microbiota play a key role in the pathogenesis of HIV infection. Alterations in the composition of intestinal flora (dysbiosis) could be associated with an impaired intestinal epithelium barrier activity and an impaired mucosal immunity function, significantly contributing to microbial translocation which is considered a major driver of chronic immune activation. Areas covered: This article provides an overview on the novel trends in probiotic therapy application. A particular emphasis is addressed to the importance of probiotics as a novel strategy to attenuate or prevent gastrointestinal involvement and to improve gut-mucosal immunity in HIV-infected subjects. Therefore, opportunities, limits and methodological criticalities of supplementation with probiotic therapy are considered and analyzed. Expert opinion: Use of probiotics is emerging as a novel strategy to manage dysbiosis and gut-mucosal impairment, to reduce immune activation and to limit a number of non-AIDS-related disorders. However, despite the growing use of probiotic therapy, mechanisms by which oral bacteria intake exhibits its effects are strain-related and disease-specific, hence clinicians need to take these two factors into consideration when suggesting probiotic supplementation to HIV-infected patients.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11573/1339869
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