Objectives: Several studies suggest that self-criticism and self-reassurance operate through different mechanisms and might interact with each other. This study examined the hypothesis that self-reassurance serves as a buffer between self-criticism and depressive symptoms in a way that self-esteem, which is rooted in a different motivational system, may not. Design: We hypothesized that self-criticism would be correlated with high levels of depressive symptoms, but that this association would be weaker at higher levels of self-reassurance abilities. We also hypothesized that self-esteem, a self-relating process based on feeling able and competent to achieve life goals, would not buffer the relationship between self-criticism and depression. Methods: Self-criticism, self-reassurance, depressive symptoms, and self-esteem were assessed in a sample of 419 participants (66% females; Mage = 33.40, SD = 11.13). Results: At higher levels of self-reassurance, the relationship between self-criticism and depressive symptoms became non-significant, supporting the buffering hypothesis of self-reassurance. Despite the high correlation between self-esteem and self-reassurance, self-esteem did not moderate the relationship between self-criticism and depressive symptoms. Conclusions: Results support the growing evidence that not all positive self-relating processes exert the same protective function against psychopathological consequences of self-criticism. Implications for psychotherapy and the validity of using compassion-focused interventions with clients with self-critical issues are discussed. Practitioner points: Self-reassurance and self-criticism are distinct processes and they should not be considered positive and negative variations of a single dimension Different types of positive self-relating do not show the same correlation with depressive symptoms. The ability to be self-reassuring protects against the psychopathological correlates of self-criticism while having high self-esteem does not. Compassion-focused interventions are promising avenues to help clients counteract the negative impact of self-criticism on mood.

Self-reassurance, not self-esteem, serves as a buffer between self-criticism and depressive symptoms / Petrocchi, N.; Dentale, F.; Gilbert, P.. - In: PSYCHOLOGY AND PSYCHOTHERAPY. - ISSN 1476-0835. - 92:3(2019), pp. 394-406. [10.1111/papt.12186]

Self-reassurance, not self-esteem, serves as a buffer between self-criticism and depressive symptoms

Petrocchi N.
;
Dentale F.;
2019

Abstract

Objectives: Several studies suggest that self-criticism and self-reassurance operate through different mechanisms and might interact with each other. This study examined the hypothesis that self-reassurance serves as a buffer between self-criticism and depressive symptoms in a way that self-esteem, which is rooted in a different motivational system, may not. Design: We hypothesized that self-criticism would be correlated with high levels of depressive symptoms, but that this association would be weaker at higher levels of self-reassurance abilities. We also hypothesized that self-esteem, a self-relating process based on feeling able and competent to achieve life goals, would not buffer the relationship between self-criticism and depression. Methods: Self-criticism, self-reassurance, depressive symptoms, and self-esteem were assessed in a sample of 419 participants (66% females; Mage = 33.40, SD = 11.13). Results: At higher levels of self-reassurance, the relationship between self-criticism and depressive symptoms became non-significant, supporting the buffering hypothesis of self-reassurance. Despite the high correlation between self-esteem and self-reassurance, self-esteem did not moderate the relationship between self-criticism and depressive symptoms. Conclusions: Results support the growing evidence that not all positive self-relating processes exert the same protective function against psychopathological consequences of self-criticism. Implications for psychotherapy and the validity of using compassion-focused interventions with clients with self-critical issues are discussed. Practitioner points: Self-reassurance and self-criticism are distinct processes and they should not be considered positive and negative variations of a single dimension Different types of positive self-relating do not show the same correlation with depressive symptoms. The ability to be self-reassuring protects against the psychopathological correlates of self-criticism while having high self-esteem does not. Compassion-focused interventions are promising avenues to help clients counteract the negative impact of self-criticism on mood.
2019
compassion-focused therapy; depression; self-compassion; self-criticism; self-esteem; self-reassurance
01 Pubblicazione su rivista::01a Articolo in rivista
Self-reassurance, not self-esteem, serves as a buffer between self-criticism and depressive symptoms / Petrocchi, N.; Dentale, F.; Gilbert, P.. - In: PSYCHOLOGY AND PSYCHOTHERAPY. - ISSN 1476-0835. - 92:3(2019), pp. 394-406. [10.1111/papt.12186]
File allegati a questo prodotto
File Dimensione Formato  
Petrocchi_Self-reassurance_2019.pdf

accesso aperto

Tipologia: Documento in Post-print (versione successiva alla peer review e accettata per la pubblicazione)
Licenza: Creative commons
Dimensione 1.29 MB
Formato Adobe PDF
1.29 MB Adobe PDF

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11573/1336724
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? 6
  • Scopus 27
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 25
social impact