Background Management of penetrating abdominal war injuries centers upon triage, echeloned care, and damage control. A civilian hospital based in a war zone can rarely rely upon these principles because it normally has limited resources and lacks rapid medical evacuation. We designed this study to describe organ injury patterns and factors related to mortality in patients with penetrating abdominal war injuries in a civilian hospital in an active war zone in Afghanistan, examine how these findings differ from those in a typical military setting, and evaluate how they might improve patients’ care. Methods We reviewed the records of all patients admitted at the Lashkargah “Emergency” hospital with penetrating abdominal injuries treated from January 2006 to December 2016. Demographic and clinical data were recorded; univariate and multivariate analyses were used to identify variables significantly associated with death. Results We treated 953 patients for penetrating abdominal injury. The population was mainly civilian (12.1% women and 21% under 14). Mean age was 23 years, and patients with blast injuries were younger than in the other groups. The mechanism of injury was bullet injury in 589 patients, shell injury in 246, stab wound in 97, and mine injury in 21. The most frequent abdominal lesion was small bowel injury (46.3%). Small and large bowel injuries were the most frequent in the blast groups, stomach injury in stab wounds. Overall mortality was 12.8%. Variables significantly associated with death were age > 34 years, mine and bullet injury, length of stay, time since injury > 5 h, injury severity score > 17, and associated injuries. Conclusions Epidemiology and patterns of injury in a civilian hospital differ from those reported in a typical military setting. Our population is mainly civilian with a significant number of women and patients under 14 years. BI are more frequent than blast injuries, and gastrointestinal injuries are more common than injuries to solid organs. In this austere setting, surgeons need to acquire a wide range of skills from multiple surgical specialties. These findings might guide trauma and general surgeons treating penetrating abdominal war wounds to achieve better care and outcome.

Injury patterns and causes of death in 953 patients with penetrating abdominal war wounds in a civilian independent non-governmental organization hospital in Lashkargah, Afghanistan / Cardi, Maurizio; Ibrahim, Khushal; Wali Alizai, Shah; Mohammad, Hamayoun; Garatti, Marco; Rainone, Antonio; Di Marzo, Francesco; LA TORRE, Giuseppe; Paschetto, Michela; Carbonari, Ludovica; Mingarelli, Valentina; Mingoli, Andrea; Sica, Giuseppe S.; Sibio, Simone. - In: WORLD JOURNAL OF EMERGENCY SURGERY. - ISSN 1749-7922. - (2019). [10.1186/s13017-019-0272-z]

Injury patterns and causes of death in 953 patients with penetrating abdominal war wounds in a civilian independent non-governmental organization hospital in Lashkargah, Afghanistan

Maurizio Cardi
;
Giuseppe La Torre;Ludovica Carbonari;Valentina Mingarelli;Andrea Mingoli;Simone Sibio
2019

Abstract

Background Management of penetrating abdominal war injuries centers upon triage, echeloned care, and damage control. A civilian hospital based in a war zone can rarely rely upon these principles because it normally has limited resources and lacks rapid medical evacuation. We designed this study to describe organ injury patterns and factors related to mortality in patients with penetrating abdominal war injuries in a civilian hospital in an active war zone in Afghanistan, examine how these findings differ from those in a typical military setting, and evaluate how they might improve patients’ care. Methods We reviewed the records of all patients admitted at the Lashkargah “Emergency” hospital with penetrating abdominal injuries treated from January 2006 to December 2016. Demographic and clinical data were recorded; univariate and multivariate analyses were used to identify variables significantly associated with death. Results We treated 953 patients for penetrating abdominal injury. The population was mainly civilian (12.1% women and 21% under 14). Mean age was 23 years, and patients with blast injuries were younger than in the other groups. The mechanism of injury was bullet injury in 589 patients, shell injury in 246, stab wound in 97, and mine injury in 21. The most frequent abdominal lesion was small bowel injury (46.3%). Small and large bowel injuries were the most frequent in the blast groups, stomach injury in stab wounds. Overall mortality was 12.8%. Variables significantly associated with death were age > 34 years, mine and bullet injury, length of stay, time since injury > 5 h, injury severity score > 17, and associated injuries. Conclusions Epidemiology and patterns of injury in a civilian hospital differ from those reported in a typical military setting. Our population is mainly civilian with a significant number of women and patients under 14 years. BI are more frequent than blast injuries, and gastrointestinal injuries are more common than injuries to solid organs. In this austere setting, surgeons need to acquire a wide range of skills from multiple surgical specialties. These findings might guide trauma and general surgeons treating penetrating abdominal war wounds to achieve better care and outcome.
2019
penetrating abdominal injuries, abdominal war wounds, war damage control, gastrointestinal war injuries
01 Pubblicazione su rivista::01a Articolo in rivista
Injury patterns and causes of death in 953 patients with penetrating abdominal war wounds in a civilian independent non-governmental organization hospital in Lashkargah, Afghanistan / Cardi, Maurizio; Ibrahim, Khushal; Wali Alizai, Shah; Mohammad, Hamayoun; Garatti, Marco; Rainone, Antonio; Di Marzo, Francesco; LA TORRE, Giuseppe; Paschetto, Michela; Carbonari, Ludovica; Mingarelli, Valentina; Mingoli, Andrea; Sica, Giuseppe S.; Sibio, Simone. - In: WORLD JOURNAL OF EMERGENCY SURGERY. - ISSN 1749-7922. - (2019). [10.1186/s13017-019-0272-z]
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11573/1332136
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