Conserving threatened species requires identifying where across their range they are being impacted by threats, yet this remains unresolved across most of Earth. Here, we present a global analysis of cumulative human impacts on threatened species by using a spatial framework that jointly considers the co-occurrence of eight threatening processes and the distribution of 5,457 terrestrial vertebrates. We show that impacts to species are widespread, occurring across 84% of Earth’s surface, and identify hotspots of impacted species richness and coolspots of unimpacted species richness. Almost one-quarter of assessed species are impacted across >90% of their distribution, and approximately 7% are impacted across their entire range. These results foreshadow localised extirpations and potential extinctions without conservation action. The spatial framework developed here offers a tool for defining strategies to directly mitigate the threats driving species’ declines, providing essential information for future national and global conservation agendas.

Hotspots of human impact on threatened terrestrial vertebrates / Allan, J. R.; Watson, J. E. M.; Di Marco, M.; O'Bryan, C. J.; Possingham, H. P.; Atkinson, S. C.; Venter, O.. - In: PLOS BIOLOGY. - ISSN 1544-9173. - 17:3(2019). [10.1371/journal.pbio.3000158]

Hotspots of human impact on threatened terrestrial vertebrates

Di Marco M.;
2019

Abstract

Conserving threatened species requires identifying where across their range they are being impacted by threats, yet this remains unresolved across most of Earth. Here, we present a global analysis of cumulative human impacts on threatened species by using a spatial framework that jointly considers the co-occurrence of eight threatening processes and the distribution of 5,457 terrestrial vertebrates. We show that impacts to species are widespread, occurring across 84% of Earth’s surface, and identify hotspots of impacted species richness and coolspots of unimpacted species richness. Almost one-quarter of assessed species are impacted across >90% of their distribution, and approximately 7% are impacted across their entire range. These results foreshadow localised extirpations and potential extinctions without conservation action. The spatial framework developed here offers a tool for defining strategies to directly mitigate the threats driving species’ declines, providing essential information for future national and global conservation agendas.
2019
conservation planning; protected area; systematic conservation; global biodiversity gloss; human footprint; land; map; worlds; risk; reduction; diversity; pressure
01 Pubblicazione su rivista::01a Articolo in rivista
Hotspots of human impact on threatened terrestrial vertebrates / Allan, J. R.; Watson, J. E. M.; Di Marco, M.; O'Bryan, C. J.; Possingham, H. P.; Atkinson, S. C.; Venter, O.. - In: PLOS BIOLOGY. - ISSN 1544-9173. - 17:3(2019). [10.1371/journal.pbio.3000158]
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11573/1282438
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