Protecting biomass carbon stocks to mitigate climate change has direct implications for biodiversity conservation. Yet, evidence that a positive association exists between carbon density and species richness is contrasting. Here, we test how this association varies (1) across spatial extents and (2) as a function of how strongly carbon and species richness depend on environmental variables. We found the correlation weakens when moving from larger extents, e.g. realms, to narrower extents, e.g. ecoregions. For ecoregions, a positive correlation emerges when both species richness and carbon density vary as functions of the same environmental variables (climate, soil, elevation). In 20% of tropical ecoregions, there are opportunities to pursue carbon conservation with direct biodiversity co-benefits, while other ecoregions require careful planning for both species and carbon to avoid potentially perverse outcomes. The broad assumption of a linear relationship between carbon and biodiversity can lead to undesired outcomes.

The extent and predictability of the biodiversity–carbon correlation / Di Marco, M.; Watson, J. E. M.; Currie, D. J.; Possingham, H. P.; Venter, O.. - In: ECOLOGY LETTERS. - ISSN 1461-023X. - 21:3(2018), pp. 365-375. [10.1111/ele.12903]

The extent and predictability of the biodiversity–carbon correlation

Di Marco M.;
2018

Abstract

Protecting biomass carbon stocks to mitigate climate change has direct implications for biodiversity conservation. Yet, evidence that a positive association exists between carbon density and species richness is contrasting. Here, we test how this association varies (1) across spatial extents and (2) as a function of how strongly carbon and species richness depend on environmental variables. We found the correlation weakens when moving from larger extents, e.g. realms, to narrower extents, e.g. ecoregions. For ecoregions, a positive correlation emerges when both species richness and carbon density vary as functions of the same environmental variables (climate, soil, elevation). In 20% of tropical ecoregions, there are opportunities to pursue carbon conservation with direct biodiversity co-benefits, while other ecoregions require careful planning for both species and carbon to avoid potentially perverse outcomes. The broad assumption of a linear relationship between carbon and biodiversity can lead to undesired outcomes.
2018
Carbon density; conservation goals; macroecology; REDD+; scale; SDG; species richness
01 Pubblicazione su rivista::01a Articolo in rivista
The extent and predictability of the biodiversity–carbon correlation / Di Marco, M.; Watson, J. E. M.; Currie, D. J.; Possingham, H. P.; Venter, O.. - In: ECOLOGY LETTERS. - ISSN 1461-023X. - 21:3(2018), pp. 365-375. [10.1111/ele.12903]
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11573/1282401
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