Objective: Currently, the best approach to the aortic arch remains unsupported by robust evidence. Most of the available data rely on small sample numbers, heterogeneous settings, and limited follow-up. The objective of this study was to evaluate early and midterm results of arch debranching and endovascular procedures.Methods: From 2005 through 2013, 104 consecutive patients underwent elective arch treatment with debranching and thoracic endovascular aortic repair. Rates of perioperative (30-day) mortality and neurological complications, and mortality, endoleak, supra-aortic vessel patency, and arch diameter changes at 5 years were analyzed.Results: Patients' mean age was 69.8 years, and 90 were males. Twenty arches were repaired for dissection. Nineteen patients required total debranching for diseases extended to zone 0. In 59, debranching and thoracic endovascular aortic repair procedures were staged. At 30 days, death, stroke, and spinal cord ischemia occurred in six, four, and three patients, respectively. Extension to ascending aorta (zone 0 landing) was the only multivariate independent predictor for perioperative mortality (odds ratio, 9.6; 95% confidence interval, 1.54-59.90; P = .015), but not for stroke. Four retrograde dissections, two fatal, occurred during the perioperative period. At 1, 3, and 5 years, Kaplan-Meier survival rates were 89.0%, 82.8%, and 70.9%, and freedom from persistent endoleak rates were 96.1%, 92.5%, and 88.3%, respectively. Over 5-year follow-up, 34 aneurysms shrank >= 5 mm, and four grew. Five reinterventions were required. Two supra-aortic vessel occlusions and no late aorta-related mortalities were recorded.Conclusions: Despite the perioperative mortality risk, the late outcome of endovascular arch repair presents a low rate of aorta-related deaths and reinterventions and acceptable midterm survival. Furthermore, more than one-third of the aneurysms' diameters decrease over 5 years as a measure of the long-term efficacy of treatment. Retrograde type A dissection remains a major concern in the perioperative period and careful arch approach is required. (J Vasc Surg 2014; 59: 107-14.)

Aortic arch debranching and thoracic endovascular repair / De Rango, Paola; Cao, Piergiorgio; Ferrer, Ciro; Simonte, Gioele; Coscarella, Carlo; Cieri, Enrico; Pogany, Gabriele; Verzini, Fabio. - In: JOURNAL OF VASCULAR SURGERY. - ISSN 0741-5214. - 59:1(2014), pp. 107-114. [10.1016/j.jvs.2013.07.010]

Aortic arch debranching and thoracic endovascular repair

Ferrer, Ciro
Writing – Original Draft Preparation
;
Simonte, Gioele;
2014

Abstract

Objective: Currently, the best approach to the aortic arch remains unsupported by robust evidence. Most of the available data rely on small sample numbers, heterogeneous settings, and limited follow-up. The objective of this study was to evaluate early and midterm results of arch debranching and endovascular procedures.Methods: From 2005 through 2013, 104 consecutive patients underwent elective arch treatment with debranching and thoracic endovascular aortic repair. Rates of perioperative (30-day) mortality and neurological complications, and mortality, endoleak, supra-aortic vessel patency, and arch diameter changes at 5 years were analyzed.Results: Patients' mean age was 69.8 years, and 90 were males. Twenty arches were repaired for dissection. Nineteen patients required total debranching for diseases extended to zone 0. In 59, debranching and thoracic endovascular aortic repair procedures were staged. At 30 days, death, stroke, and spinal cord ischemia occurred in six, four, and three patients, respectively. Extension to ascending aorta (zone 0 landing) was the only multivariate independent predictor for perioperative mortality (odds ratio, 9.6; 95% confidence interval, 1.54-59.90; P = .015), but not for stroke. Four retrograde dissections, two fatal, occurred during the perioperative period. At 1, 3, and 5 years, Kaplan-Meier survival rates were 89.0%, 82.8%, and 70.9%, and freedom from persistent endoleak rates were 96.1%, 92.5%, and 88.3%, respectively. Over 5-year follow-up, 34 aneurysms shrank >= 5 mm, and four grew. Five reinterventions were required. Two supra-aortic vessel occlusions and no late aorta-related mortalities were recorded.Conclusions: Despite the perioperative mortality risk, the late outcome of endovascular arch repair presents a low rate of aorta-related deaths and reinterventions and acceptable midterm survival. Furthermore, more than one-third of the aneurysms' diameters decrease over 5 years as a measure of the long-term efficacy of treatment. Retrograde type A dissection remains a major concern in the perioperative period and careful arch approach is required. (J Vasc Surg 2014; 59: 107-14.)
2014
Adult; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Aorta, Thoracic; Aortography; Female; Humans; Italy; Kaplan-Meier Estimate; Logistic Models; Male; Middle Aged; Odds Ratio; Postoperative Complications; Retrospective Studies; Risk Factors; Time Factors; Tomography, X-Ray Computed; Treatment Outcome; Blood Vessel Prosthesis Implantation; Endovascular Procedures
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Aortic arch debranching and thoracic endovascular repair / De Rango, Paola; Cao, Piergiorgio; Ferrer, Ciro; Simonte, Gioele; Coscarella, Carlo; Cieri, Enrico; Pogany, Gabriele; Verzini, Fabio. - In: JOURNAL OF VASCULAR SURGERY. - ISSN 0741-5214. - 59:1(2014), pp. 107-114. [10.1016/j.jvs.2013.07.010]
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11573/1210853
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