Representing others’ intentions is central to primate social life. We explored the role of dorsal premotor cortex (PMd) in discriminating between self and others’ behavior while two male rhesus monkeys performed a non-match-to-goal task in a monkey-human paradigm. During each trial, two of four potential targets were randomly presented on the right and left parts of a screen, and the monkey or the human was required to choose the one that did not match the previously chosen target. Each agent had to monitor the other's action in order to select the correct target in that agent's own turn. We report neurons that selectively encoded the future choice of the monkey, the human agent, or both. Our findings suggest that PMd activity shows a high degree of self-other differentiation during face-to-face interactions, leading to an independent representation of what others will do instead of entailing self-centered mental rehearsal or mirror-like activities. Understanding others’ intentions is essential to successful primate social life. Cirillo et al. explore the role of dorsal premotor cortex (PMd) in discriminating between self and others’ behavior while macaques interacted with humans. They show that the majority of neurons encoding the future choice did so selectively for the monkey or the human agent. PMd thus differentiates self from others’ behavior, leading to independent representations of future actions.

Coding of self and other's future choices in dorsal premotor cortex during social interaction / Cirillo, Rossella; Ferrucci, Lorenzo; Marcos, Encarni; Ferraina, Stefano; Genovesio, Aldo. - In: CELL REPORTS. - ISSN 2211-1247. - 24:7(2018), pp. 1679-1686. [10.1016/j.celrep.2018.07.030]

Coding of self and other's future choices in dorsal premotor cortex during social interaction

Cirillo, Rossella
Primo
;
Ferrucci, Lorenzo
Secondo
;
Ferraina, Stefano
Penultimo
;
Genovesio, Aldo
Ultimo
2018

Abstract

Representing others’ intentions is central to primate social life. We explored the role of dorsal premotor cortex (PMd) in discriminating between self and others’ behavior while two male rhesus monkeys performed a non-match-to-goal task in a monkey-human paradigm. During each trial, two of four potential targets were randomly presented on the right and left parts of a screen, and the monkey or the human was required to choose the one that did not match the previously chosen target. Each agent had to monitor the other's action in order to select the correct target in that agent's own turn. We report neurons that selectively encoded the future choice of the monkey, the human agent, or both. Our findings suggest that PMd activity shows a high degree of self-other differentiation during face-to-face interactions, leading to an independent representation of what others will do instead of entailing self-centered mental rehearsal or mirror-like activities. Understanding others’ intentions is essential to successful primate social life. Cirillo et al. explore the role of dorsal premotor cortex (PMd) in discriminating between self and others’ behavior while macaques interacted with humans. They show that the majority of neurons encoding the future choice did so selectively for the monkey or the human agent. PMd thus differentiates self from others’ behavior, leading to independent representations of future actions.
2018
mirror neurons; non-human primate; prediction; premotor cortex; primate cognition; social interaction; biochemistry, genetics and molecular biology (all)
01 Pubblicazione su rivista::01a Articolo in rivista
Coding of self and other's future choices in dorsal premotor cortex during social interaction / Cirillo, Rossella; Ferrucci, Lorenzo; Marcos, Encarni; Ferraina, Stefano; Genovesio, Aldo. - In: CELL REPORTS. - ISSN 2211-1247. - 24:7(2018), pp. 1679-1686. [10.1016/j.celrep.2018.07.030]
File allegati a questo prodotto
File Dimensione Formato  
Cirillo_Coding_2018.pdf

accesso aperto

Tipologia: Versione editoriale (versione pubblicata con il layout dell'editore)
Licenza: Creative commons
Dimensione 2.7 MB
Formato Adobe PDF
2.7 MB Adobe PDF

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11573/1194049
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? 7
  • Scopus 13
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 13
social impact