Three experiments investigated the malleability of perceived plausibility and the subjective likelihood of occurrence of plausible and implausible events among participants who had no recollection of experiencing them. In Experiment 1, a plausibility-enhancing manipulation (reading accounts of the occurrence of events) combined with a personalized suggestion increased the perceived plausibility of the implausible event, as well as participants' ratings of the likelihood that they had experienced it. Plausibility and likelihood ratings were uncorrelated. Subsequent studies showed that the plausibility manipulation alone was sufficient to increase likelihood ratings but only if the accounts that participants read were set in a contemporary context. These data suggest that false autobiographical beliefs can be induced in clinical and forensic contexts even for initially implausible events.

Changing beliefs about implausible autobiographical events: A little plausibility goes a long way / Mazzoni, Giuliana; Loftus, Elizabeth F.; Kirsch, Irving. - In: JOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY. APPLIED. - ISSN 1076-898X. - 7:1(2001), pp. 51-59. [10.1037/1076-898X.7.1.51]

Changing beliefs about implausible autobiographical events: A little plausibility goes a long way

Mazzoni, Giuliana
;
2001

Abstract

Three experiments investigated the malleability of perceived plausibility and the subjective likelihood of occurrence of plausible and implausible events among participants who had no recollection of experiencing them. In Experiment 1, a plausibility-enhancing manipulation (reading accounts of the occurrence of events) combined with a personalized suggestion increased the perceived plausibility of the implausible event, as well as participants' ratings of the likelihood that they had experienced it. Plausibility and likelihood ratings were uncorrelated. Subsequent studies showed that the plausibility manipulation alone was sufficient to increase likelihood ratings but only if the accounts that participants read were set in a contemporary context. These data suggest that false autobiographical beliefs can be induced in clinical and forensic contexts even for initially implausible events.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11573/1189798
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