Metamemory judgements and reality monitoring judgements were compared for real and imagined stimuli. Line drawings of everyday items were either perceived or imagined in differing ratios, to (a) investigate people's ability to predict the class of item that would be better recalled (Judgements of Learning, JOL), and the class of item which would be better sourced (Judgements of Source, JOS) in a future recall test, and (b) test the hypothesis that participants would show a bias towards calling remembered items real when the source had been forgotten. Although participants' JOLs indicated that they believed real items would be more memorable than imagined, in both experiments a larger proportion of items from either class (real or imagined) was only recalled when presentation modality was less frequent for that class. By contrast, JOSs were no different for real or imagined items, even though source attribution was more accurate for real than imagined items. An attribution of memories to real rather than to imagined events that often occurs when participants are unsure about the source (labelled a 'bias towards the real') was due to phenomenological qualities of the memories. The results are discussed in terms of Johnson and Raye's (1981) reality-monitoring model. Copyright © 2002 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Metamemory and reality monitoring / Kelly, Amy; Carroll, Marie; Mazzoni, Giuliana. - In: APPLIED COGNITIVE PSYCHOLOGY. - ISSN 0888-4080. - 16:4(2002), pp. 407-428. [10.1002/acp.803]

Metamemory and reality monitoring

Mazzoni, Giuliana
2002

Abstract

Metamemory judgements and reality monitoring judgements were compared for real and imagined stimuli. Line drawings of everyday items were either perceived or imagined in differing ratios, to (a) investigate people's ability to predict the class of item that would be better recalled (Judgements of Learning, JOL), and the class of item which would be better sourced (Judgements of Source, JOS) in a future recall test, and (b) test the hypothesis that participants would show a bias towards calling remembered items real when the source had been forgotten. Although participants' JOLs indicated that they believed real items would be more memorable than imagined, in both experiments a larger proportion of items from either class (real or imagined) was only recalled when presentation modality was less frequent for that class. By contrast, JOSs were no different for real or imagined items, even though source attribution was more accurate for real than imagined items. An attribution of memories to real rather than to imagined events that often occurs when participants are unsure about the source (labelled a 'bias towards the real') was due to phenomenological qualities of the memories. The results are discussed in terms of Johnson and Raye's (1981) reality-monitoring model. Copyright © 2002 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11573/1189124
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