This study tested the hypothesis that the search for information pertinent to answering the question "Did event x happen to you?" is preceded by a preliminary plausibility assessment, the outcome of which affects the amount of effort invested in the search. Undergraduate students were asked to assess the plausibility of six events and subsequently to rate their belief that each event had happened to them before the age of 6. Unknown to them, response times (RTs) for answering the belief questions were also recorded. RTs for making belief judgments were more highly correlated with plausibility than with belief, and were significantly associated with plausibility even when belief ratings were controlled. As predicted, RTs were very short when the event was deemed highly implausible and increased sharply if the event was deemed at least somewhat plausible; significant but less pronounced increases in RTs followed as plausibility increased further. Copyright 2007 Psychonomic Society, Inc.

Did you witness demonic possession? A response time analysis of the relationship between event plausibility and autobiographical beliefs / Mazzoni, Giuliana. - In: PSYCHONOMIC BULLETIN & REVIEW. - ISSN 1069-9384. - 14:2(2007), pp. 277-281. [10.3758/BF03194064]

Did you witness demonic possession? A response time analysis of the relationship between event plausibility and autobiographical beliefs

Mazzoni, Giuliana
2007

Abstract

This study tested the hypothesis that the search for information pertinent to answering the question "Did event x happen to you?" is preceded by a preliminary plausibility assessment, the outcome of which affects the amount of effort invested in the search. Undergraduate students were asked to assess the plausibility of six events and subsequently to rate their belief that each event had happened to them before the age of 6. Unknown to them, response times (RTs) for answering the belief questions were also recorded. RTs for making belief judgments were more highly correlated with plausibility than with belief, and were significantly associated with plausibility even when belief ratings were controlled. As predicted, RTs were very short when the event was deemed highly implausible and increased sharply if the event was deemed at least somewhat plausible; significant but less pronounced increases in RTs followed as plausibility increased further. Copyright 2007 Psychonomic Society, Inc.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11573/1188962
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