Context Neurotensin (NT), an intestinal peptide released by fat ingestion, promotes lipid absorption; higher circulating NT levels are associated with type 2 diabetes (T2D), obesity, and cardiovascular disease. Whether NT is related to nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) has not been fully investigated. Objective To study the relationship between plasma proneurotensin 1 to 117 (pro-NT), a stable fragment of the NT precursor hormone, and the presence/severity of NAFLD/NASH and to unravel correlates of increased pro-NT levels. Design/Setting/Participants For this cross-sectional study, 60 obese individuals undergoing bariatric surgery for clinical purposes were recruited. The association between pro-NT and NAFLD was further investigated in 260 consecutive subjects referred to our outpatient clinics for metabolic evaluations, including liver ultrasonography. The study population underwent complete metabolic characterization; in the obese cohort, liver biopsies were performed during surgery. Main Outcome Measures Plasma pro-NT levels in relation to NAFLD/NASH. Results Obese subjects with biopsy-proven NAFLD (53%) had significantly higher plasma pro-NT than those without NAFLD (183.6 ± 81.4 vs 86.7 ± 56.8 pmol/L, P < 0.001). Greater pro-NT correlated with NAFLD presence (P < 0.001) and severity (P < 0.001), age, female sex, insulin resistance, and T2D. Higher pro-NT predicted NAFLD with an area under receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.836 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.73 to 0.94; P < 0.001]. Belonging to the highest pro-NT quartile correlated with increased NAFLD risk (odds ratio, 2.62; 95% CI, 1.08 to 6.40) after adjustment for confounders. The association between higher pro-NT and NAFLD was confirmed in the second cohort independently from confounders. Conclusions Increased plasma pro-NT levels identify the presence/severity of NAFLD; in dysmetabolic individuals, NT may specifically promote hepatic fat accumulation through mechanisms likely related to increased insulin resistance. © 2018 Endocrine Society.

Increased plasma proneurotensin levels identify NAFLD in adults with and without type 2 diabetes / Barchetta, Ilaria; Cimini, Flavia Agata; Leonetti, Frida; Capoccia, Danila; Di Cristofano, Claudio; Silecchia, Gianfranco; Orho-Melander, Marju; Melander, Olle; Cavallo, Maria Gisella. - In: THE JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ENDOCRINOLOGY AND METABOLISM. - ISSN 0021-972X. - STAMPA. - 103:6(2018), pp. 2253-2260. [10.1210/jc.2017-02751]

Increased plasma proneurotensin levels identify NAFLD in adults with and without type 2 diabetes

Barchetta, Ilaria;Cimini, Flavia Agata;Leonetti, Frida;Capoccia, Danila;Di Cristofano, Claudio;Silecchia, Gianfranco;Cavallo, Maria Gisella
2018

Abstract

Context Neurotensin (NT), an intestinal peptide released by fat ingestion, promotes lipid absorption; higher circulating NT levels are associated with type 2 diabetes (T2D), obesity, and cardiovascular disease. Whether NT is related to nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) has not been fully investigated. Objective To study the relationship between plasma proneurotensin 1 to 117 (pro-NT), a stable fragment of the NT precursor hormone, and the presence/severity of NAFLD/NASH and to unravel correlates of increased pro-NT levels. Design/Setting/Participants For this cross-sectional study, 60 obese individuals undergoing bariatric surgery for clinical purposes were recruited. The association between pro-NT and NAFLD was further investigated in 260 consecutive subjects referred to our outpatient clinics for metabolic evaluations, including liver ultrasonography. The study population underwent complete metabolic characterization; in the obese cohort, liver biopsies were performed during surgery. Main Outcome Measures Plasma pro-NT levels in relation to NAFLD/NASH. Results Obese subjects with biopsy-proven NAFLD (53%) had significantly higher plasma pro-NT than those without NAFLD (183.6 ± 81.4 vs 86.7 ± 56.8 pmol/L, P < 0.001). Greater pro-NT correlated with NAFLD presence (P < 0.001) and severity (P < 0.001), age, female sex, insulin resistance, and T2D. Higher pro-NT predicted NAFLD with an area under receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.836 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.73 to 0.94; P < 0.001]. Belonging to the highest pro-NT quartile correlated with increased NAFLD risk (odds ratio, 2.62; 95% CI, 1.08 to 6.40) after adjustment for confounders. The association between higher pro-NT and NAFLD was confirmed in the second cohort independently from confounders. Conclusions Increased plasma pro-NT levels identify the presence/severity of NAFLD; in dysmetabolic individuals, NT may specifically promote hepatic fat accumulation through mechanisms likely related to increased insulin resistance. © 2018 Endocrine Society.
2018
context neurotensin; higher circulating; cardiovascular disease; type 2 diabetes
01 Pubblicazione su rivista::01a Articolo in rivista
Increased plasma proneurotensin levels identify NAFLD in adults with and without type 2 diabetes / Barchetta, Ilaria; Cimini, Flavia Agata; Leonetti, Frida; Capoccia, Danila; Di Cristofano, Claudio; Silecchia, Gianfranco; Orho-Melander, Marju; Melander, Olle; Cavallo, Maria Gisella. - In: THE JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ENDOCRINOLOGY AND METABOLISM. - ISSN 0021-972X. - STAMPA. - 103:6(2018), pp. 2253-2260. [10.1210/jc.2017-02751]
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11573/1093938
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