Objectives: To investigate the association between adherence to the Mediterranean Diet (Med-Diet), cardiometabolic disorders and polypharmacy. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: Geriatrics outpatient clinic, Policlinico Umberto I, Sapienza University of Rome. Participants: 508 patients (219 male, 289 female) aged 50 to 89 who were evaluated for cardiovascular and metabolic disorders. Methods and Measurements: Patients underwent a comprehensive medical assessment including medical history and the use of medications. Adherence to Med-Diet was assessed using the validated Med-Diet 14-item questionnaire; for the analysis, patients were divided in high (≥8) and medium-low (<8) adherence. Polypharmacy was defined as taking ≥5 medications. Results: 476 patients completed the study. Mean age was 70.4 years; 58% female. Median Med-Diet score was 8 (6-9). Patients with medium-low adherence had higher body mass index (p=0.029) and higher prevalence of arterial hypertension (p<0.001), previous coronary (p=0.002) and cerebrovascular events (p=0.011), diabetes, (p<0.001) and dyslipidemia (p=0.001) compared to those at high adherence. Med-Diet score decreased with the number of cardiometabolic disorders (p<0.001). The prevalence of polypharmacy was 39%. Consumption of olive oil (p=0.005), vegetables, (p<0.001), wine (p=0.017), legumes (p=0.028), fish (p=0.046) and nuts (p=0.045) were all inversely associated with the overall number of medications. In a multivariable regression model, medium-low adherence to Med-Diet was independently associated to polypharmacy (O.R.:1.859; 95% CI 1.142 to 3.025; p=0.013), after adjusting for possible confounding factors. Conclusion: Med-Diet was inversely associated with cardiometabolic disorders and with polypharmacy, suggesting that improved Med-Diet adherence might potentially delay the onset of age-related health deterioration and reduce the need of multiple medications.

Aging and adherence to the mediterranean diet. relationship with cardiometabolic disorders and polypharmacy / Vicinanza, Roberto; Troisi, Giovanni; Cangemi, Roberto; De Martino, Massimo Ulderico; Pastori, Daniele; Bernardini, Sciaila; Crisciotti, Flaminia; Di Violante, Federica; Frizza, Alessandro; Cacciafesta, Mauro; Pignatelli, Pasquale; Marigliano, Vincenzo. - In: THE JOURNAL OF NUTRITION, HEALTH & AGING. - ISSN 1279-7707. - ELETTRONICO. - 22:1(2018), pp. 73-81. [10.1007/s12603-017-0922-3]

Aging and adherence to the mediterranean diet. relationship with cardiometabolic disorders and polypharmacy

Roberto Vicinanza
;
Giovanni Troisi;Roberto Cangemi;Massimo Ulderico De Martino;Daniele Pastori;Sciaila Bernardini;Flaminia Crisciotti;Mauro Cacciafesta;Pasquale Pignatelli;Vincenzo Marigliano
2018

Abstract

Objectives: To investigate the association between adherence to the Mediterranean Diet (Med-Diet), cardiometabolic disorders and polypharmacy. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: Geriatrics outpatient clinic, Policlinico Umberto I, Sapienza University of Rome. Participants: 508 patients (219 male, 289 female) aged 50 to 89 who were evaluated for cardiovascular and metabolic disorders. Methods and Measurements: Patients underwent a comprehensive medical assessment including medical history and the use of medications. Adherence to Med-Diet was assessed using the validated Med-Diet 14-item questionnaire; for the analysis, patients were divided in high (≥8) and medium-low (<8) adherence. Polypharmacy was defined as taking ≥5 medications. Results: 476 patients completed the study. Mean age was 70.4 years; 58% female. Median Med-Diet score was 8 (6-9). Patients with medium-low adherence had higher body mass index (p=0.029) and higher prevalence of arterial hypertension (p<0.001), previous coronary (p=0.002) and cerebrovascular events (p=0.011), diabetes, (p<0.001) and dyslipidemia (p=0.001) compared to those at high adherence. Med-Diet score decreased with the number of cardiometabolic disorders (p<0.001). The prevalence of polypharmacy was 39%. Consumption of olive oil (p=0.005), vegetables, (p<0.001), wine (p=0.017), legumes (p=0.028), fish (p=0.046) and nuts (p=0.045) were all inversely associated with the overall number of medications. In a multivariable regression model, medium-low adherence to Med-Diet was independently associated to polypharmacy (O.R.:1.859; 95% CI 1.142 to 3.025; p=0.013), after adjusting for possible confounding factors. Conclusion: Med-Diet was inversely associated with cardiometabolic disorders and with polypharmacy, suggesting that improved Med-Diet adherence might potentially delay the onset of age-related health deterioration and reduce the need of multiple medications.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11573/1082582
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