Happiness, livability and health are concepts which in the last ten years are become always more present in the urban planning studies. Many societies rank the most happy city in the world or in a nation; many indicators try to report factors which are capable to report the livability of a place; topics related to healthy city are investigated in different manner, e.g. both in relation to the elderly or people with diseases, and with places which need to be improved from the pollution point of view (Appleyard 1981; Sepe, 2017). These elements, indicators and factors are often referred to other concepts such as sustainability and resilience, which in turn are very used to define questions related to both contemporary urban, social, environmental and economic topics. If, from a part, the livability and health concepts are always more explored in urban studies, on the other, due to the strong contamination coming from other disciplines, is possible to understand why a place is livable, but is difficult to design a place being sure that this will be livable and healthy. Some of the more recognized principle which make a place livable include: good accessibility and orientation; presence of green; walkability; flexibility and variety of spaces; distinctivity; presence of facilities, events and activities; perception of safeness and security. And these factors are observable in the actions such as: happy people walking or cycling, children plying in parks, people of all age spending time in enjoying the place or making different activities (AARP Livable Communities, 2015; HereandNow, 2017) Furthermore, as Lucy Sauders (2017) asserts, air pollution, social connectedness, mental well-being, road danger, noise and physical activity can impact our health and it is important to implement good practice in urban design in order to introduce these elements into the planning at all scales. As many studies report, “urban planning and design can help to mitigate risk factors and to contribute to better mental health and happiness in the city”. Factors such as “green place, active place, pro-social place and safe place (…) can facilitate innovative thinking (…) and promote better mental health and well-being”. (McCay 2017). Although theories agree on the benefits that people derive from these factors, it is not easy to assume and demonstrate that these improve livability, happiness and then health. Starting from these premises, aim of this work is to illustrate the original Ecoliv@ble design method, carried out in the framework of CNR research projects. The method aims at: identifying sustainable urban livability and the factors which make places happy, livable and healthy from the users point of view; identifying design interventions to enhance or create both urban livability and health. The case study of Vancouver complete the paper.

Liveable and healthy city design / Sepe, M. - (2018), pp. 177-189. - WIT TRANSACTIONS ON ECOLOGY AND THE ENVIRONMENT. [10.2495/SDP180171].

Liveable and healthy city design

Sepe M
2018

Abstract

Happiness, livability and health are concepts which in the last ten years are become always more present in the urban planning studies. Many societies rank the most happy city in the world or in a nation; many indicators try to report factors which are capable to report the livability of a place; topics related to healthy city are investigated in different manner, e.g. both in relation to the elderly or people with diseases, and with places which need to be improved from the pollution point of view (Appleyard 1981; Sepe, 2017). These elements, indicators and factors are often referred to other concepts such as sustainability and resilience, which in turn are very used to define questions related to both contemporary urban, social, environmental and economic topics. If, from a part, the livability and health concepts are always more explored in urban studies, on the other, due to the strong contamination coming from other disciplines, is possible to understand why a place is livable, but is difficult to design a place being sure that this will be livable and healthy. Some of the more recognized principle which make a place livable include: good accessibility and orientation; presence of green; walkability; flexibility and variety of spaces; distinctivity; presence of facilities, events and activities; perception of safeness and security. And these factors are observable in the actions such as: happy people walking or cycling, children plying in parks, people of all age spending time in enjoying the place or making different activities (AARP Livable Communities, 2015; HereandNow, 2017) Furthermore, as Lucy Sauders (2017) asserts, air pollution, social connectedness, mental well-being, road danger, noise and physical activity can impact our health and it is important to implement good practice in urban design in order to introduce these elements into the planning at all scales. As many studies report, “urban planning and design can help to mitigate risk factors and to contribute to better mental health and happiness in the city”. Factors such as “green place, active place, pro-social place and safe place (…) can facilitate innovative thinking (…) and promote better mental health and well-being”. (McCay 2017). Although theories agree on the benefits that people derive from these factors, it is not easy to assume and demonstrate that these improve livability, happiness and then health. Starting from these premises, aim of this work is to illustrate the original Ecoliv@ble design method, carried out in the framework of CNR research projects. The method aims at: identifying sustainable urban livability and the factors which make places happy, livable and healthy from the users point of view; identifying design interventions to enhance or create both urban livability and health. The case study of Vancouver complete the paper.
2018
WIT Transactions on Ecology and the Environment, Vol 217
978-1-78466-291-2
liveability; urban health; urban happiness; public space; place identity; urban design
02 Pubblicazione su volume::02a Capitolo o Articolo
Liveable and healthy city design / Sepe, M. - (2018), pp. 177-189. - WIT TRANSACTIONS ON ECOLOGY AND THE ENVIRONMENT. [10.2495/SDP180171].
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11573/1658542
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