This article examines the intertextuality concerning the ball scene in Romeo and Juliet’s Italian and French narrative sources, comparing them with the Shakespearean text, with a double aim. On the one hand, I will try to understand how the carnivalesque Italian masked ball, or masquerade, present in the whole intertextual chain (from Da Porto to Shakespeare), acquires a new significance when taken onstage in late-sixteenth-century England. On the other hand, the omission of the so-called ballo del torchio or del cappello (Torch or Bonnet Dance), understood as a dance-within-the-masque moment in the sources, and its resemanticisation through the persistence of the symbolism of the torch/light in Shakespeare’s tragedy, will be analysed. In both cases, I will argue, the cultural and semantic shift of the dances performed or removed is a direct consequence of their de-Mediterraneanisation (Morris 2003) and change of chronotopic coordinates. My contrastive analysis has been facilitated by the SENS archive (Shakespeare’s Narrative Sources: Italian Novellas and Their European Dissemination) developed at the University of Verona (https://sens.skene.univr.it/shakespeares-works/romeoand- juliet/) and carried out by treating the main narrative sources, or sources proximate, and their target text as a trilingual parallel corpus. Specific parts of text, verses and scenes have been compared and contrasted thanks to the text(ual) segmentation of each text available on the website.

Italian Dance Tradition and Translation in Romeo and Juliet: From Narrative Sources to Shakespeare

Fabio Ciambella
2022

Abstract

This article examines the intertextuality concerning the ball scene in Romeo and Juliet’s Italian and French narrative sources, comparing them with the Shakespearean text, with a double aim. On the one hand, I will try to understand how the carnivalesque Italian masked ball, or masquerade, present in the whole intertextual chain (from Da Porto to Shakespeare), acquires a new significance when taken onstage in late-sixteenth-century England. On the other hand, the omission of the so-called ballo del torchio or del cappello (Torch or Bonnet Dance), understood as a dance-within-the-masque moment in the sources, and its resemanticisation through the persistence of the symbolism of the torch/light in Shakespeare’s tragedy, will be analysed. In both cases, I will argue, the cultural and semantic shift of the dances performed or removed is a direct consequence of their de-Mediterraneanisation (Morris 2003) and change of chronotopic coordinates. My contrastive analysis has been facilitated by the SENS archive (Shakespeare’s Narrative Sources: Italian Novellas and Their European Dissemination) developed at the University of Verona (https://sens.skene.univr.it/shakespeares-works/romeoand- juliet/) and carried out by treating the main narrative sources, or sources proximate, and their target text as a trilingual parallel corpus. Specific parts of text, verses and scenes have been compared and contrasted thanks to the text(ual) segmentation of each text available on the website.
979-12-210-1706-9
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11573/1652393
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