The current global scene is characterized by a huge paradox: on one side there is the scourge of poverty, on the other, 1.3 billion tonnes of food is wasted around the world every year. No huger and responsible consumption are included in the Sustainable Development Goals proposed by the United Nations. Global hunger and food waste are one of the grand challenges of our time and management scholars are called to provide insight for businesses and prepare them to act towards these goal (George et. Al 2016). Within the food industry a big issue refers to matching supply and demand that is incredibly hard to manage and this create surplus. Historically, food banks were settled up to responses to the needs of hungry or food-insecure people with the primary scope of redistribution of donated and surplus food (Riches, 2002). Nowadays digitalization and the growth of the sharing economy has led to the rise of food sharing platforms that reshaped the distribution systems scenario by enabling connection between suppliers and beneficiaries of food while having high level of social impact in terms of reducing waste and/or fight hungry (Michelini et al. 2018). Literature on sharing and food sharing focused mainly on platform’s characteristics/dimensions and business models (Michelini et al., 2018) The role of the innovation in sharing economy is still under-investigated. The present study aimed to identify:  the dimensions of business model innovation in food sharing platforms;  the role of suppliers in business model innovation process;  the main critical factors in the innovation process. Qualitative research methodology and multiple case studies analysis suited this study because of the lack of systematic knowledge on the role of the ecosystem in scaling the social impact. Furthermore, because of the need of inquiring into a ‘how’ or ‘why’ question about a contemporary set of events and it can provide a detailed understanding of particular situations which may be useful to improve theory (Yin 2003). The primary and secondary data will analyze inductively, by adopting the “Gioia methodology” (Gioia et al., 2013).

Food sharing and innovative business models / Di Leo, A.; Michelini, L.; Principato, L.. - (2019).

Food sharing and innovative business models

Di Leo A.;Michelini L.;
2019

Abstract

The current global scene is characterized by a huge paradox: on one side there is the scourge of poverty, on the other, 1.3 billion tonnes of food is wasted around the world every year. No huger and responsible consumption are included in the Sustainable Development Goals proposed by the United Nations. Global hunger and food waste are one of the grand challenges of our time and management scholars are called to provide insight for businesses and prepare them to act towards these goal (George et. Al 2016). Within the food industry a big issue refers to matching supply and demand that is incredibly hard to manage and this create surplus. Historically, food banks were settled up to responses to the needs of hungry or food-insecure people with the primary scope of redistribution of donated and surplus food (Riches, 2002). Nowadays digitalization and the growth of the sharing economy has led to the rise of food sharing platforms that reshaped the distribution systems scenario by enabling connection between suppliers and beneficiaries of food while having high level of social impact in terms of reducing waste and/or fight hungry (Michelini et al. 2018). Literature on sharing and food sharing focused mainly on platform’s characteristics/dimensions and business models (Michelini et al., 2018) The role of the innovation in sharing economy is still under-investigated. The present study aimed to identify:  the dimensions of business model innovation in food sharing platforms;  the role of suppliers in business model innovation process;  the main critical factors in the innovation process. Qualitative research methodology and multiple case studies analysis suited this study because of the lack of systematic knowledge on the role of the ecosystem in scaling the social impact. Furthermore, because of the need of inquiring into a ‘how’ or ‘why’ question about a contemporary set of events and it can provide a detailed understanding of particular situations which may be useful to improve theory (Yin 2003). The primary and secondary data will analyze inductively, by adopting the “Gioia methodology” (Gioia et al., 2013).
Food Industry Wastes. Assessment and Recuperation of Commodities, Second Edition
food waste; business model; food sharing
02 Pubblicazione su volume::02a Capitolo o Articolo
Food sharing and innovative business models / Di Leo, A.; Michelini, L.; Principato, L.. - (2019).
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11573/1315828
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social impact