A theoretical system of metacognitive components for self-directed memory retrieval is described, and relevant empirical data are reported. The metacognitive components include (1) a preliminary feeling of knowing for an answer; (2) a confidence judgment about a retrieved answer after a search of memory; (3) a decision of whether to output a retrieved answer; (4) a subsequent feeling of knowing for a nonretrieved answer; and (5) a decision of whether to continue or terminate searching memory for the unretrieved answer. Some of these components have been investigated previously but only in isolation. Here we integrate them into a theoretical system for directing one's own retrieval. The system gives a good account of relevant older findings and of several new findings, in particular, those demonstrating how people trade off the costs and benefits of continued searching and how the threshold for the decision to continue searching varies in a predictable way. The theoretical system also accounts for several newly reported findings from earlier research conducted on Mount Everest (and related findings in the literature) by postulating two separable major subdivisions in the system: one that gives rise to guesses (including commission errors and correct responses) and another that gives rise to omission errors. Different metacognitive mechanisms are proposed to have the major responsibility for each of those subdivisions.

An integrative system of metamemory components involved in retrieval / Barnes, Alice E.; Nelson, Thomas O.; Dunlosky, John; Mazzoni, Giuliana; Narens, Louis. - (1999), pp. 285-313.

An integrative system of metamemory components involved in retrieval

Mazzoni, Giuliana;
1999

Abstract

A theoretical system of metacognitive components for self-directed memory retrieval is described, and relevant empirical data are reported. The metacognitive components include (1) a preliminary feeling of knowing for an answer; (2) a confidence judgment about a retrieved answer after a search of memory; (3) a decision of whether to output a retrieved answer; (4) a subsequent feeling of knowing for a nonretrieved answer; and (5) a decision of whether to continue or terminate searching memory for the unretrieved answer. Some of these components have been investigated previously but only in isolation. Here we integrate them into a theoretical system for directing one's own retrieval. The system gives a good account of relevant older findings and of several new findings, in particular, those demonstrating how people trade off the costs and benefits of continued searching and how the threshold for the decision to continue searching varies in a predictable way. The theoretical system also accounts for several newly reported findings from earlier research conducted on Mount Everest (and related findings in the literature) by postulating two separable major subdivisions in the system: one that gives rise to guesses (including commission errors and correct responses) and another that gives rise to omission errors. Different metacognitive mechanisms are proposed to have the major responsibility for each of those subdivisions.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11573/1189784
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